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Diurnally Fluctuating pCO2 Modifies the Physiological Responses of Coral Recruits Under Ocean Acidification.
Front Physiol. 2018; 9:1952.FP

Abstract

Diurnal pCO2 fluctuations have the potential to modulate the biological impact of ocean acidification (OA) on reef calcifiers, yet little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of scleractinian corals to fluctuating carbonate chemistry under OA. Here, we exposed newly settled Pocillopora damicornis for 7 days to ambient pCO2, steady and elevated pCO2 (stable OA) and diurnally fluctuating pCO2 under future OA scenario (fluctuating OA). We measured the photo-physiology, growth (lateral growth, budding and calcification), oxidative stress and activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA), Ca-ATPase and Mg-ATPase. Results showed that while OA enhanced the photochemical performance of in hospite symbionts, it also increased catalase activity and lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, both OA treatments altered the activities of host and symbiont CA, suggesting functional changes in the uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for photosynthesis and calcification. Most importantly, only the fluctuating OA treatment resulted in a slight drop in calcification with concurrent up-regulation of Ca-ATPase and Mg-ATPase, implying increased energy expenditure on calcification. Consequently, asexual budding rates decreased by 50% under fluctuating OA. These results suggest that diel pCO2 oscillations could modify the physiological responses and potentially alter the energy budget of coral recruits under future OA, and that fluctuating OA is more energetically expensive for the maintenance of coral recruits than stable OA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Hainan Tropical Marine Biology Research Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Sanya, China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Hainan Tropical Marine Biology Research Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Sanya, China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Hainan Tropical Marine Biology Research Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Sanya, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China.Shenzhen Research Institute and Department of Ocean Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China.Shenzhen Research Institute and Department of Ocean Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China.Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Bio-resources and Ecology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Marine Biology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Hainan Tropical Marine Biology Research Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Sanya, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30692940

Citation

Jiang, Lei, et al. "Diurnally Fluctuating pCO2 Modifies the Physiological Responses of Coral Recruits Under Ocean Acidification." Frontiers in Physiology, vol. 9, 2018, p. 1952.
Jiang L, Guo YJ, Zhang F, et al. Diurnally Fluctuating pCO2 Modifies the Physiological Responses of Coral Recruits Under Ocean Acidification. Frontiers in physiology. 2018;9:1952.
Jiang, L., Guo, Y. J., Zhang, F., Zhang, Y. Y., McCook, L. J., Yuan, X. C., Lei, X. M., Zhou, G. W., Guo, M. L., Cai, L., Lian, J. S., Qian, P. Y., & Huang, H. (2018). Diurnally Fluctuating pCO2 Modifies the Physiological Responses of Coral Recruits Under Ocean Acidification. Frontiers in Physiology, 9, 1952. https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.01952
Jiang L, et al. Diurnally Fluctuating pCO2 Modifies the Physiological Responses of Coral Recruits Under Ocean Acidification. Frontiers in physiology. 2018;9:1952. PubMed PMID: 30692940.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diurnally Fluctuating pCO2 Modifies the Physiological Responses of Coral Recruits Under Ocean Acidification. AU - Jiang,Lei, AU - Guo,Ya-Juan, AU - Zhang,Fang, AU - Zhang,Yu-Yang, AU - McCook,Laurence John, AU - Yuan,Xiang-Cheng, AU - Lei,Xin-Ming, AU - Zhou,Guo-Wei, AU - Guo,Ming-Lan, AU - Cai,Lin, AU - Lian,Jian-Sheng, AU - Qian,Pei-Yuan, AU - Huang,Hui, Y1 - 2019/01/11/ PY - 2018/10/03/received PY - 2018/12/22/accepted PY - 2019/1/30/entrez PY - 2019/1/30/pubmed PY - 2019/1/30/medline KW - carbonic anhydrase KW - coral calcification KW - diurnal pCO2 fluctuations KW - ocean acidification KW - proton pump KW - trade-off SP - 1952 EP - 1952 JF - Frontiers in physiology VL - 9 N2 - Diurnal pCO2 fluctuations have the potential to modulate the biological impact of ocean acidification (OA) on reef calcifiers, yet little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of scleractinian corals to fluctuating carbonate chemistry under OA. Here, we exposed newly settled Pocillopora damicornis for 7 days to ambient pCO2, steady and elevated pCO2 (stable OA) and diurnally fluctuating pCO2 under future OA scenario (fluctuating OA). We measured the photo-physiology, growth (lateral growth, budding and calcification), oxidative stress and activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA), Ca-ATPase and Mg-ATPase. Results showed that while OA enhanced the photochemical performance of in hospite symbionts, it also increased catalase activity and lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, both OA treatments altered the activities of host and symbiont CA, suggesting functional changes in the uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) for photosynthesis and calcification. Most importantly, only the fluctuating OA treatment resulted in a slight drop in calcification with concurrent up-regulation of Ca-ATPase and Mg-ATPase, implying increased energy expenditure on calcification. Consequently, asexual budding rates decreased by 50% under fluctuating OA. These results suggest that diel pCO2 oscillations could modify the physiological responses and potentially alter the energy budget of coral recruits under future OA, and that fluctuating OA is more energetically expensive for the maintenance of coral recruits than stable OA. SN - 1664-042X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30692940/Diurnally_Fluctuating_pCO2_Modifies_the_Physiological_Responses_of_Coral_Recruits_Under_Ocean_Acidification_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.01952 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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