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A turiasaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of the United Kingdom.
PeerJ. 2019; 7:e6348.P

Abstract

The Jurassic/Cretaceous (J/K) boundary, 145 million years ago, has long been recognised as an extinction event or faunal turnover for sauropod dinosaurs, with many 'basal' lineages disappearing. However, recently, a number of 'extinct' groups have been recognised in the Early Cretaceous, including diplodocids in Gondwana, and non-titanosauriform macronarians in Laurasia. Turiasauria, a clade of non-neosauropod eusauropods, was originally thought to have been restricted to the Late Jurassic of western Europe. However, its distribution has recently been extended to the Late Jurassic of Tanzania (Tendaguria tanzaniensis), as well as to the Early Cretaceous of the USA (Mierasaurus bobyoungi and Moabosaurus utahensis), demonstrating the survival of another 'basal' clade across the J/K boundary. Teeth from the Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of western Europe and North Africa have also tentatively been attributed to turiasaurs, whilst recent phylogenetic analyses recovered Late Jurassic taxa from Argentina and China as further members of Turiasauria. Here, an anterior dorsal centrum and neural arch (both NHMUK 1871) from the Early Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of the UK are described for the first time. NHMUK 1871 shares several synapomorphies with Turiasauria, especially the turiasaurs Moabosaurus and Tendaguria, including: (1) a strongly dorsoventrally compressed centrum; (2) the retention of prominent epipophyses; and (3) an extremely low, non-bifid neural spine. NHMUK 1871 therefore represents the first postcranial evidence for Turiasauria from European deposits of Early Cretaceous age. Although turiasaurs show clear heterodont dentition, only broad, characteristically 'heart'-shaped teeth can currently be attributed to Turiasauria with confidence. As such, several putative turiasaur occurrences based on isolated teeth from Europe, as well as the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous of Africa, cannot be confidently referred to Turiasauria. Unequivocal evidence for turiasaurs is therefore restricted to the late Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of western Europe, the Late Jurassic of Tanzania, and the late Early Cretaceous of the USA, although remains from elsewhere might ultimately demonstrate that the group had a near-global distribution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30697494

Citation

Mannion, Philip D.. "A Turiasaurian Sauropod Dinosaur From the Early Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of the United Kingdom." PeerJ, vol. 7, 2019, pp. e6348.
Mannion PD. A turiasaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of the United Kingdom. PeerJ. 2019;7:e6348.
Mannion, P. D. (2019). A turiasaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of the United Kingdom. PeerJ, 7, e6348. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.6348
Mannion PD. A Turiasaurian Sauropod Dinosaur From the Early Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of the United Kingdom. PeerJ. 2019;7:e6348. PubMed PMID: 30697494.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A turiasaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of the United Kingdom. A1 - Mannion,Philip D, Y1 - 2019/01/24/ PY - 2018/10/08/received PY - 2018/12/27/accepted PY - 2019/1/31/entrez PY - 2019/1/31/pubmed PY - 2019/1/31/medline KW - Biogeography KW - Cretaceous KW - Eusauropoda KW - Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary KW - Laurasia KW - Mesozoic KW - Turiasauria KW - Wealden SP - e6348 EP - e6348 JF - PeerJ JO - PeerJ VL - 7 N2 - The Jurassic/Cretaceous (J/K) boundary, 145 million years ago, has long been recognised as an extinction event or faunal turnover for sauropod dinosaurs, with many 'basal' lineages disappearing. However, recently, a number of 'extinct' groups have been recognised in the Early Cretaceous, including diplodocids in Gondwana, and non-titanosauriform macronarians in Laurasia. Turiasauria, a clade of non-neosauropod eusauropods, was originally thought to have been restricted to the Late Jurassic of western Europe. However, its distribution has recently been extended to the Late Jurassic of Tanzania (Tendaguria tanzaniensis), as well as to the Early Cretaceous of the USA (Mierasaurus bobyoungi and Moabosaurus utahensis), demonstrating the survival of another 'basal' clade across the J/K boundary. Teeth from the Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of western Europe and North Africa have also tentatively been attributed to turiasaurs, whilst recent phylogenetic analyses recovered Late Jurassic taxa from Argentina and China as further members of Turiasauria. Here, an anterior dorsal centrum and neural arch (both NHMUK 1871) from the Early Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of the UK are described for the first time. NHMUK 1871 shares several synapomorphies with Turiasauria, especially the turiasaurs Moabosaurus and Tendaguria, including: (1) a strongly dorsoventrally compressed centrum; (2) the retention of prominent epipophyses; and (3) an extremely low, non-bifid neural spine. NHMUK 1871 therefore represents the first postcranial evidence for Turiasauria from European deposits of Early Cretaceous age. Although turiasaurs show clear heterodont dentition, only broad, characteristically 'heart'-shaped teeth can currently be attributed to Turiasauria with confidence. As such, several putative turiasaur occurrences based on isolated teeth from Europe, as well as the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous of Africa, cannot be confidently referred to Turiasauria. Unequivocal evidence for turiasaurs is therefore restricted to the late Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous of western Europe, the Late Jurassic of Tanzania, and the late Early Cretaceous of the USA, although remains from elsewhere might ultimately demonstrate that the group had a near-global distribution. SN - 2167-8359 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30697494/A_turiasaurian_sauropod_dinosaur_from_the_Early_Cretaceous_Wealden_Supergroup_of_the_United_Kingdom_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.6348 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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