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Accretion of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mouse Tissues Did Not Differ between Its Purified Phospholipid and Triacylglycerol Forms.
Lipids. 2019 01; 54(1):25-37.L

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that dietary krill oil leads to higher omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) tissue accretion compared to fish oil because the former is rich in n-3 PUFA esterified as phospholipids (PL), while n-3 PUFA in fish oil are primarily esterified as triacylglycerols (TAG). Tissue accretion of the same dietary concentrations of PL- and TAG-docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) (DHA) has not been compared and was the focus of this study. Mice (n = 12/group) were fed either a control diet or one of six DHA (1%, 2%, or 4%) as PL-DHA or TAG-DHA diets for 4 weeks. Compared with the control, DHA concentration in liver, adipose tissue (AT), heart, and eye, but not brain, were significantly higher in mice consuming either PL- or TAG-DHA, but there was no difference in DHA concentration in all tissues between the PL- or TAG-DHA forms. Consumption of PL- and TAG-DHA at all concentrations significantly elevated eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) (EPA) in all tissues when compared with the control group, while docoshexapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) (DPA) was significantly higher in all tissues except for the eye and heart. Both DHA forms lowered total omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFA) in all tissues and total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the liver and AT; total saturated fatty acid (SFA) were lowered in the liver but elevated in the AT. An increase in the DHA dose, independent of DHA forms, significantly lowered n-6 PUFA and significantly elevated n-3 PUFA concentration in all tissues. Our results do not support the claim that the PL form of n-3 PUFA leads to higher n-3 PUFA tissue accretion than their TAG form.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Western Human Nutrition Research Center, ARS, USDA and Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, 430 West Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616, USA.Western Human Nutrition Research Center, ARS, USDA and Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, 430 West Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616, USA.Western Regional Research Center, ARS, USDA, Albany, CA 94710, USA.Western Human Nutrition Research Center, ARS, USDA and Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, 430 West Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30697752

Citation

Adkins, Yuriko, et al. "Accretion of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mouse Tissues Did Not Differ Between Its Purified Phospholipid and Triacylglycerol Forms." Lipids, vol. 54, no. 1, 2019, pp. 25-37.
Adkins Y, Laugero KD, Mackey B, et al. Accretion of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mouse Tissues Did Not Differ between Its Purified Phospholipid and Triacylglycerol Forms. Lipids. 2019;54(1):25-37.
Adkins, Y., Laugero, K. D., Mackey, B., & Kelley, D. S. (2019). Accretion of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mouse Tissues Did Not Differ between Its Purified Phospholipid and Triacylglycerol Forms. Lipids, 54(1), 25-37. https://doi.org/10.1002/lipd.12115
Adkins Y, et al. Accretion of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mouse Tissues Did Not Differ Between Its Purified Phospholipid and Triacylglycerol Forms. Lipids. 2019;54(1):25-37. PubMed PMID: 30697752.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Accretion of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mouse Tissues Did Not Differ between Its Purified Phospholipid and Triacylglycerol Forms. AU - Adkins,Yuriko, AU - Laugero,Kevin D, AU - Mackey,Bruce, AU - Kelley,Darshan S, Y1 - 2019/01/29/ PY - 2018/07/09/received PY - 2018/11/26/revised PY - 2018/12/04/accepted PY - 2019/1/31/pubmed PY - 2019/9/3/medline PY - 2019/1/31/entrez KW - Adipose tissue KW - Brain KW - DHA KW - Eye KW - Heart KW - Liver KW - n-3 PUFA KW - n-6 PUFA SP - 25 EP - 37 JF - Lipids JO - Lipids VL - 54 IS - 1 N2 - Recent studies suggest that dietary krill oil leads to higher omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) tissue accretion compared to fish oil because the former is rich in n-3 PUFA esterified as phospholipids (PL), while n-3 PUFA in fish oil are primarily esterified as triacylglycerols (TAG). Tissue accretion of the same dietary concentrations of PL- and TAG-docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) (DHA) has not been compared and was the focus of this study. Mice (n = 12/group) were fed either a control diet or one of six DHA (1%, 2%, or 4%) as PL-DHA or TAG-DHA diets for 4 weeks. Compared with the control, DHA concentration in liver, adipose tissue (AT), heart, and eye, but not brain, were significantly higher in mice consuming either PL- or TAG-DHA, but there was no difference in DHA concentration in all tissues between the PL- or TAG-DHA forms. Consumption of PL- and TAG-DHA at all concentrations significantly elevated eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) (EPA) in all tissues when compared with the control group, while docoshexapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) (DPA) was significantly higher in all tissues except for the eye and heart. Both DHA forms lowered total omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFA) in all tissues and total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in the liver and AT; total saturated fatty acid (SFA) were lowered in the liver but elevated in the AT. An increase in the DHA dose, independent of DHA forms, significantly lowered n-6 PUFA and significantly elevated n-3 PUFA concentration in all tissues. Our results do not support the claim that the PL form of n-3 PUFA leads to higher n-3 PUFA tissue accretion than their TAG form. SN - 1558-9307 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30697752/Accretion_of_Dietary_Docosahexaenoic_Acid_in_Mouse_Tissues_Did_Not_Differ_between_Its_Purified_Phospholipid_and_Triacylglycerol_Forms_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/lipd.12115 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -