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Spatial-Temporal Pattern of Sulfate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in an Intertidal Zone of the East China Sea.

Abstract

Methane is a primary greenhouse gas which is responsible for global warming. The sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (S-AOM) process catalyzed by anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a vital link connecting the global carbon and sulfur cycles, and it is considered to be the overriding methane sink in marine ecosystem. However, there have been few studies regarding the role of S-AOM process and the distribution of ANME archaea in intertidal ecosystem. The intertidal zone is a buffer zone between sea and land and plays an important role in global geochemical cycle. In the present study, the abundance, potential methane oxidation rate, and community structure of ANME archaea in the intertidal zone were studied by quantitative PCR, stable isotope tracing method and high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that the potential S-AOM activity ranged from 0 to 0.77 nmol 13CO2 g-1 (dry sediment) day-1 The copy number of 16S rRNA gene of ANME archaea reached 106 ∼ 107 copies g-1 (dry sediment). The average contribution of S-AOM to total anaerobic methane oxidation was up to 34.5%, while denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation accounted for the rest, which implied that S-AOM process was an essential methane sink that cannot be overlooked in intertidal ecosystem. The simulated column experiments also indicated that ANME archaea were sensitive to oxygen and preferred anaerobic environmental conditions. This study will help us gain a better understanding of the global carbon-sulfur cycle and greenhouse gas emission reduction and introduce a new perspective into the enrichment of ANME archaea.IMPORTANCE The sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (S-AOM) process catalyzed by anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a vital link connecting the global carbon and sulfur cycles. We conducted a research into the spatial-temporal pattern of S-AOM process and the distribution of ANME archaea in coastal sediments collected from the intertidal zone. The results implied that S-AOM process was a methane sink that cannot be overlooked in the intertidal ecosystem. We also found that ANME archaea were sensitive to oxygen and preferred anaerobic environmental conditions. This study will help us gain a better understanding of the global carbon-sulfur cycle and greenhouse gas emission reduction and introduce a new perspective into the enrichment of ANME archaea.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China mafang@hit.edu.cn blhu@zju.edu.cn.College of Environment, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, China.Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China mafang@hit.edu.cn blhu@zju.edu.cn. Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory for Water Pollution Control and Environmental Safety, Hangzhou, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30709818

Citation

Wang, Jiaqi, et al. "Spatial-Temporal Pattern of Sulfate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in an Intertidal Zone of the East China Sea." Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 85, no. 7, 2019.
Wang J, Hua M, Cai C, et al. Spatial-Temporal Pattern of Sulfate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in an Intertidal Zone of the East China Sea. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2019;85(7).
Wang, J., Hua, M., Cai, C., Hu, J., Wang, J., Yang, H., ... Hu, B. (2019). Spatial-Temporal Pattern of Sulfate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in an Intertidal Zone of the East China Sea. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 85(7), doi:10.1128/AEM.02638-18.
Wang J, et al. Spatial-Temporal Pattern of Sulfate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in an Intertidal Zone of the East China Sea. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2019 Apr 1;85(7) PubMed PMID: 30709818.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Spatial-Temporal Pattern of Sulfate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in an Intertidal Zone of the East China Sea. AU - Wang,Jiaqi, AU - Hua,Miaolian, AU - Cai,Chaoyang, AU - Hu,Jiajie, AU - Wang,Junren, AU - Yang,Hongrui, AU - Ma,Fang, AU - Qian,Haifeng, AU - Zheng,Ping, AU - Hu,Baolan, Y1 - 2019/03/22/ PY - 2018/10/31/received PY - 2019/01/19/accepted PY - 2019/2/3/pubmed PY - 2019/2/3/medline PY - 2019/2/3/entrez KW - anaerobic methanotrophic archaea KW - intertidal zone KW - simulated column experiments KW - sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation JF - Applied and environmental microbiology JO - Appl. Environ. Microbiol. VL - 85 IS - 7 N2 - Methane is a primary greenhouse gas which is responsible for global warming. The sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (S-AOM) process catalyzed by anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a vital link connecting the global carbon and sulfur cycles, and it is considered to be the overriding methane sink in marine ecosystem. However, there have been few studies regarding the role of S-AOM process and the distribution of ANME archaea in intertidal ecosystem. The intertidal zone is a buffer zone between sea and land and plays an important role in global geochemical cycle. In the present study, the abundance, potential methane oxidation rate, and community structure of ANME archaea in the intertidal zone were studied by quantitative PCR, stable isotope tracing method and high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that the potential S-AOM activity ranged from 0 to 0.77 nmol 13CO2 g-1 (dry sediment) day-1 The copy number of 16S rRNA gene of ANME archaea reached 106 ∼ 107 copies g-1 (dry sediment). The average contribution of S-AOM to total anaerobic methane oxidation was up to 34.5%, while denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation accounted for the rest, which implied that S-AOM process was an essential methane sink that cannot be overlooked in intertidal ecosystem. The simulated column experiments also indicated that ANME archaea were sensitive to oxygen and preferred anaerobic environmental conditions. This study will help us gain a better understanding of the global carbon-sulfur cycle and greenhouse gas emission reduction and introduce a new perspective into the enrichment of ANME archaea.IMPORTANCE The sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (S-AOM) process catalyzed by anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a vital link connecting the global carbon and sulfur cycles. We conducted a research into the spatial-temporal pattern of S-AOM process and the distribution of ANME archaea in coastal sediments collected from the intertidal zone. The results implied that S-AOM process was a methane sink that cannot be overlooked in the intertidal ecosystem. We also found that ANME archaea were sensitive to oxygen and preferred anaerobic environmental conditions. This study will help us gain a better understanding of the global carbon-sulfur cycle and greenhouse gas emission reduction and introduce a new perspective into the enrichment of ANME archaea. SN - 1098-5336 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30709818/Spatial_Temporal_Pattern_of_Sulfate_Dependent_Anaerobic_Methane_Oxidation_in_an_Intertidal_Zone_of_the_East_China_Sea_ L2 - http://aem.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=30709818 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -