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Maternal experience of their infants' crying in the context of war trauma: Determinants and consequences.
Infant Ment Health J. 2019 03; 40(2):186-203.IM

Abstract

We examined, first, how prenatal maternal mental health and war trauma predicted mothers' experience of their infant crying, indicated by emotions, cognitions, and behavior; and second, how these experiences influenced the mother-infant interaction and infant development. Participants were 511 Palestinian mothers from the Gaza Strip, reporting their war trauma, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and perceived stress during pregnancy (Time 1). They reported experiences of infant crying at 4 months (Time 2), and the mother-infant interaction and infant sensorimotor and language development at 12 months of infants' age (Time 3). Results revealed that maternal mental health problems, but not war trauma, were important to experiences of infant crying. A high level of PTSD symptoms predicted negative emotions evoked by infant crying, and high depressive symptoms predicted low active and positive responses to crying. Unexpectedly, high prenatal perceived stress predicted high active and positive responsiveness. Concerning the consequences, mothers' sensitive interpretation of infant crying predicted optimal infant sensorimotor development, and mothers' active and positive responses predicted high emotional availability in mother-infant interaction. Crying is the first communication tool for infants, and mothers' sensitive responses to crying contribute to infant well-being. Therefore, reinforcing mother's optimal responses is important when helping war-affected dyads.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.Department of Education and Psychology, Islamic University Gaza, Gaza City, Palestine.Department of Educational Psychology, Al Quds Open University, Gaza Strip, Palestine.Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.Department of Psychology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30715730

Citation

Lahti, Katri, et al. "Maternal Experience of Their Infants' Crying in the Context of War Trauma: Determinants and Consequences." Infant Mental Health Journal, vol. 40, no. 2, 2019, pp. 186-203.
Lahti K, Vänskä M, Qouta SR, et al. Maternal experience of their infants' crying in the context of war trauma: Determinants and consequences. Infant Ment Health J. 2019;40(2):186-203.
Lahti, K., Vänskä, M., Qouta, S. R., Diab, S. Y., Perko, K., & Punamäki, R. L. (2019). Maternal experience of their infants' crying in the context of war trauma: Determinants and consequences. Infant Mental Health Journal, 40(2), 186-203. https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21768
Lahti K, et al. Maternal Experience of Their Infants' Crying in the Context of War Trauma: Determinants and Consequences. Infant Ment Health J. 2019;40(2):186-203. PubMed PMID: 30715730.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal experience of their infants' crying in the context of war trauma: Determinants and consequences. AU - Lahti,Katri, AU - Vänskä,Mervi, AU - Qouta,Samir R, AU - Diab,Safwat Y, AU - Perko,Kaisa, AU - Punamäki,Raija-Leena, Y1 - 2019/02/04/ PY - 2019/2/5/pubmed PY - 2019/11/30/medline PY - 2019/2/5/entrez KW - Kriegstrauma KW - Mutter-Kind-Interaktion KW - Säuglingsentwicklung KW - Säuglingsschreien KW - bébé pleurant KW - desarrollo del infante KW - développement du nourrisson KW - infant crying KW - infant development KW - interacción madre-infante KW - interaction mère-bébé KW - llanto del infante KW - mother-infant interaction KW - prenatal mental health KW - pränatale psychische Gesundheit KW - salud mental prenatal KW - santé mentale prénatale KW - trauma de guerra KW - traumatisme de guerre KW - war trauma KW - التفاعل بين الام والرضيع KW - الصحة النفسية قبل الولادة KW - بكاء الرضع KW - صدمه الحرب KW - نمو الرضع KW - 乳幼児の泣き声 KW - 乳幼児の発達 KW - 出産メンタルヘルス KW - 嬰兒哭鬧 KW - 嬰兒發育 KW - 戦争トラウマ KW - 戰爭創傷 KW - 母嬰互動 KW - 母子相互作用 KW - 產前心理健康 SP - 186 EP - 203 JF - Infant mental health journal JO - Infant Ment Health J VL - 40 IS - 2 N2 - We examined, first, how prenatal maternal mental health and war trauma predicted mothers' experience of their infant crying, indicated by emotions, cognitions, and behavior; and second, how these experiences influenced the mother-infant interaction and infant development. Participants were 511 Palestinian mothers from the Gaza Strip, reporting their war trauma, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and perceived stress during pregnancy (Time 1). They reported experiences of infant crying at 4 months (Time 2), and the mother-infant interaction and infant sensorimotor and language development at 12 months of infants' age (Time 3). Results revealed that maternal mental health problems, but not war trauma, were important to experiences of infant crying. A high level of PTSD symptoms predicted negative emotions evoked by infant crying, and high depressive symptoms predicted low active and positive responses to crying. Unexpectedly, high prenatal perceived stress predicted high active and positive responsiveness. Concerning the consequences, mothers' sensitive interpretation of infant crying predicted optimal infant sensorimotor development, and mothers' active and positive responses predicted high emotional availability in mother-infant interaction. Crying is the first communication tool for infants, and mothers' sensitive responses to crying contribute to infant well-being. Therefore, reinforcing mother's optimal responses is important when helping war-affected dyads. SN - 1097-0355 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30715730/Maternal_experience_of_their_infants'_crying_in_the_context_of_war_trauma:_Determinants_and_consequences_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/imhj.21768 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -