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The First Decade of Web-Based Sports Injury Surveillance: Descriptive Epidemiology of Injuries in US High School Girls' Basketball (2005-2006 Through 2013-2014) and National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Basketball (2004-2005 Through 2013-2014).
J Athl Train. 2018 Nov; 53(11):1037-1048.JA

Abstract

CONTEXT

The advent of Web-based sports injury surveillance via programs such as the High School Reporting Information Online system and the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program has aided the acquisition of girls' and women's basketball injury data.

OBJECTIVE

To describe the epidemiology of injuries sustained in high school girls' basketball in the 2005-2006 through 2013-2014 academic years and collegiate women's basketball in the 2004-2005 through 2013-2014 academic years using Web-based sports injury surveillance.

DESIGN

Descriptive epidemiology study.

SETTING

Online injury surveillance from basketball teams in high school girls (annual average = 100) and collegiate women (annual average = 57).

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS

Girls' and women's basketball players who participated in practices and competitions during the 2005-2006 through 2013-2014 academic years in high school or the 2004-2005 through 2013-2014 academic years in college.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S)

Certified athletic trainers collected time-loss (≥24 hours) injury and exposure data. Injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs) were calculated. Injury rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare injury rates by school size or division, time in season, event type, and competition level.

RESULTS

The High School Reporting Information Online system documented 2930 time-loss injuries during 1 609 733 AEs; the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program documented 3887 time-loss injuries during 783 600 AEs. The injury rate was higher in college than in high school (4.96 versus 1.82/1000 AEs; IRR = 2.73; 95% CI = 2.60, 2.86). The injury rate was higher in competitions than in practices for both high school (IRR = 3.03; 95% CI = 2.82, 3.26) and collegiate (IRR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.86, 2.12) players. The most common injuries at both levels were ligament sprains, concussions, and muscle/tendon strains; the majority of injuries affected the ankle, knee, and head/face. These injuries were often caused by contact with another player or a noncontact mechanism.

CONCLUSIONS

Injury rates were higher in collegiate than in high school athletes and in competitions than in practices. Similarities in distributions of injuries by body parts, specific diagnoses, and mechanisms of injury suggest that both levels may benefit from similar injury-prevention strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Athletic Training, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus.Department of Kinesiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville.Division of Athletic Training, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus. Jameson Crane Sports Medicine Research Institute, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus.Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora.Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora.Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, Indianapolis, IN.Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute, CA.Lebanon Valley College, Annville, PA.Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora. Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora.Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Injury Prevention Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.Injury Prevention Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30715913

Citation

Clifton, Daniel R., et al. "The First Decade of Web-Based Sports Injury Surveillance: Descriptive Epidemiology of Injuries in US High School Girls' Basketball (2005-2006 Through 2013-2014) and National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Basketball (2004-2005 Through 2013-2014)." Journal of Athletic Training, vol. 53, no. 11, 2018, pp. 1037-1048.
Clifton DR, Hertel J, Onate JA, et al. The First Decade of Web-Based Sports Injury Surveillance: Descriptive Epidemiology of Injuries in US High School Girls' Basketball (2005-2006 Through 2013-2014) and National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Basketball (2004-2005 Through 2013-2014). J Athl Train. 2018;53(11):1037-1048.
Clifton, D. R., Hertel, J., Onate, J. A., Currie, D. W., Pierpoint, L. A., Wasserman, E. B., Knowles, S. B., Dompier, T. P., Comstock, R. D., Marshall, S. W., & Kerr, Z. Y. (2018). The First Decade of Web-Based Sports Injury Surveillance: Descriptive Epidemiology of Injuries in US High School Girls' Basketball (2005-2006 Through 2013-2014) and National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Basketball (2004-2005 Through 2013-2014). Journal of Athletic Training, 53(11), 1037-1048. https://doi.org/10.4085/1062-6050-150-17
Clifton DR, et al. The First Decade of Web-Based Sports Injury Surveillance: Descriptive Epidemiology of Injuries in US High School Girls' Basketball (2005-2006 Through 2013-2014) and National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Basketball (2004-2005 Through 2013-2014). J Athl Train. 2018;53(11):1037-1048. PubMed PMID: 30715913.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The First Decade of Web-Based Sports Injury Surveillance: Descriptive Epidemiology of Injuries in US High School Girls' Basketball (2005-2006 Through 2013-2014) and National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Basketball (2004-2005 Through 2013-2014). AU - Clifton,Daniel R, AU - Hertel,Jay, AU - Onate,James A, AU - Currie,Dustin W, AU - Pierpoint,Lauren A, AU - Wasserman,Erin B, AU - Knowles,Sarah B, AU - Dompier,Thomas P, AU - Comstock,R Dawn, AU - Marshall,Stephen W, AU - Kerr,Zachary Y, PY - 2019/2/5/entrez PY - 2019/2/5/pubmed PY - 2019/3/2/medline KW - females KW - injury rates KW - student-athletes SP - 1037 EP - 1048 JF - Journal of athletic training JO - J Athl Train VL - 53 IS - 11 N2 - CONTEXT: The advent of Web-based sports injury surveillance via programs such as the High School Reporting Information Online system and the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program has aided the acquisition of girls' and women's basketball injury data. OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of injuries sustained in high school girls' basketball in the 2005-2006 through 2013-2014 academic years and collegiate women's basketball in the 2004-2005 through 2013-2014 academic years using Web-based sports injury surveillance. DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. SETTING: Online injury surveillance from basketball teams in high school girls (annual average = 100) and collegiate women (annual average = 57). PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Girls' and women's basketball players who participated in practices and competitions during the 2005-2006 through 2013-2014 academic years in high school or the 2004-2005 through 2013-2014 academic years in college. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Certified athletic trainers collected time-loss (≥24 hours) injury and exposure data. Injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs) were calculated. Injury rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare injury rates by school size or division, time in season, event type, and competition level. RESULTS: The High School Reporting Information Online system documented 2930 time-loss injuries during 1 609 733 AEs; the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program documented 3887 time-loss injuries during 783 600 AEs. The injury rate was higher in college than in high school (4.96 versus 1.82/1000 AEs; IRR = 2.73; 95% CI = 2.60, 2.86). The injury rate was higher in competitions than in practices for both high school (IRR = 3.03; 95% CI = 2.82, 3.26) and collegiate (IRR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.86, 2.12) players. The most common injuries at both levels were ligament sprains, concussions, and muscle/tendon strains; the majority of injuries affected the ankle, knee, and head/face. These injuries were often caused by contact with another player or a noncontact mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: Injury rates were higher in collegiate than in high school athletes and in competitions than in practices. Similarities in distributions of injuries by body parts, specific diagnoses, and mechanisms of injury suggest that both levels may benefit from similar injury-prevention strategies. SN - 1938-162X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30715913/The_First_Decade_of_Web_Based_Sports_Injury_Surveillance:_Descriptive_Epidemiology_of_Injuries_in_US_High_School_Girls'_Basketball__2005_2006_Through_2013_2014__and_National_Collegiate_Athletic_Association_Women's_Basketball__2004_2005_Through_2013_2014__ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30715913/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -