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Frontal slow wave resting EEG power is higher in individuals at Ultra High Risk for psychosis than in healthy controls but is not associated with negative symptoms or functioning.
Schizophr Res. 2019 06; 208:293-299.SR

Abstract

Decreased brain activity in the frontal region, as indicated by increased slow wave EEG power measured by electrodes place on the skull over this area, in association with negative symptoms has previously been shown to distinguish ultra-high risk (UHR) individuals who later transitioned to psychosis (UHR-P) from those who did not transition (UHR-NP). The aims of the current study were to: 1) replicate these results and 2) investigate whether similar association between increased frontal slow wave activity and functioning shows any value in the prediction of transition to psychosis in UHR individuals. The brain activity, recorded using EEG, of 44 UHR individuals and 38 healthy controls was included in the analyses. Symptom severity was assessed in UHR participants and functioning was measured in both groups. The power in the theta frequency band in the frontal region of UHR individuals was higher than in controls. However, there was no difference between the UHR-P and the UHR-NP groups, and no change in slow frequency power following transition to psychosis. The correlation between delta frequency power and negative symptoms previously observed was not present in our UHR cohort, and there was no association between frontal delta or theta and functioning in either group. Increased delta power was rather correlated with depressive symptoms in the UHR group. Future research will be needed to better understand when, in the course of the illness, does the slow wave activity in the frontal area becomes impaired.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.School of Psychology, UNSW, Sydney, Australia.Orygen Youth Health and Melbourne Health, Parkville, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.School of Psychology, UNSW, Sydney, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Australia; Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. Electronic address: suzie.lavoie@orygen.org.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30738699

Citation

Sollychin, Miranda, et al. "Frontal Slow Wave Resting EEG Power Is Higher in Individuals at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis Than in Healthy Controls but Is Not Associated With Negative Symptoms or Functioning." Schizophrenia Research, vol. 208, 2019, pp. 293-299.
Sollychin M, Jack BN, Polari A, et al. Frontal slow wave resting EEG power is higher in individuals at Ultra High Risk for psychosis than in healthy controls but is not associated with negative symptoms or functioning. Schizophr Res. 2019;208:293-299.
Sollychin, M., Jack, B. N., Polari, A., Ando, A., Amminger, G. P., Markulev, C., McGorry, P. D., Nelson, B., Whitford, T. J., Yuen, H. P., & Lavoie, S. (2019). Frontal slow wave resting EEG power is higher in individuals at Ultra High Risk for psychosis than in healthy controls but is not associated with negative symptoms or functioning. Schizophrenia Research, 208, 293-299. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2019.01.039
Sollychin M, et al. Frontal Slow Wave Resting EEG Power Is Higher in Individuals at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis Than in Healthy Controls but Is Not Associated With Negative Symptoms or Functioning. Schizophr Res. 2019;208:293-299. PubMed PMID: 30738699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Frontal slow wave resting EEG power is higher in individuals at Ultra High Risk for psychosis than in healthy controls but is not associated with negative symptoms or functioning. AU - Sollychin,Miranda, AU - Jack,Bradley N, AU - Polari,Andrea, AU - Ando,Ayaka, AU - Amminger,G Paul, AU - Markulev,Connie, AU - McGorry,Patrick D, AU - Nelson,Barnaby, AU - Whitford,Thomas J, AU - Yuen,Hok Pan, AU - Lavoie,Suzie, Y1 - 2019/02/06/ PY - 2017/02/14/received PY - 2019/01/23/revised PY - 2019/01/27/accepted PY - 2019/2/11/pubmed PY - 2020/8/18/medline PY - 2019/2/11/entrez KW - Delta KW - Functioning KW - Prediction KW - Psychosis KW - Slow wave KW - Theta SP - 293 EP - 299 JF - Schizophrenia research JO - Schizophr Res VL - 208 N2 - Decreased brain activity in the frontal region, as indicated by increased slow wave EEG power measured by electrodes place on the skull over this area, in association with negative symptoms has previously been shown to distinguish ultra-high risk (UHR) individuals who later transitioned to psychosis (UHR-P) from those who did not transition (UHR-NP). The aims of the current study were to: 1) replicate these results and 2) investigate whether similar association between increased frontal slow wave activity and functioning shows any value in the prediction of transition to psychosis in UHR individuals. The brain activity, recorded using EEG, of 44 UHR individuals and 38 healthy controls was included in the analyses. Symptom severity was assessed in UHR participants and functioning was measured in both groups. The power in the theta frequency band in the frontal region of UHR individuals was higher than in controls. However, there was no difference between the UHR-P and the UHR-NP groups, and no change in slow frequency power following transition to psychosis. The correlation between delta frequency power and negative symptoms previously observed was not present in our UHR cohort, and there was no association between frontal delta or theta and functioning in either group. Increased delta power was rather correlated with depressive symptoms in the UHR group. Future research will be needed to better understand when, in the course of the illness, does the slow wave activity in the frontal area becomes impaired. SN - 1573-2509 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30738699/Frontal_slow_wave_resting_EEG_power_is_higher_in_individuals_at_Ultra_High_Risk_for_psychosis_than_in_healthy_controls_but_is_not_associated_with_negative_symptoms_or_functioning_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0920-9964(19)30042-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -