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Indoor air pollution and tobacco smoke exposure: impact on nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage in mothers and infants in an African birth cohort study.
ERJ Open Res 2019; 5(1)EO

Abstract

Indoor air pollution (IAP) or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure may influence nasopharyngeal carriage of bacterial species and development of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). The aim of this study was to longitudinally investigate the impact of antenatal or postnatal IAP/ETS exposure on nasopharyngeal bacteria in mothers and infants. A South African cohort study followed mother-infant pairs from birth through the first year. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken at birth, 6 and 12 months for bacterial culture. Multivariable and multivariate Poisson regression investigated associations between nasopharyngeal bacterial species and IAP/ETS. IAP exposures (particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, volatile organic compounds) were measured at home visits. ETS exposure was measured through maternal and infant urine cotinine. Infants received the 13-valent pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae B conjugate vaccines. There were 881 maternal and 2605 infant nasopharyngeal swabs. Antenatal ETS exposure was associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage in mothers (adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.73 (95% CI 1.03-2.92)) while postnatal ETS exposure was associated with carriage in infants (aRR 1.14 (95% CI 1.00-1.30)) Postnatal particulate matter exposure was associated with the nasopharyngeal carriage of H. influenzae (aRR 1.68 (95% CI 1.10- 2.57)) or Moraxella catarrhalis (aRR 1.42 (95% CI 1.03-1.97)) in infants. Early-life environmental exposures are associated with an increased prevalence of specific nasopharyngeal bacteria during infancy, which may predispose to LRTI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept of Paediatrics and Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, and SAMRC Unit on Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.Dept of Paediatrics and Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, and SAMRC Unit on Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.Dept of Paediatrics and Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, and SAMRC Unit on Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.Dept of Molecular and Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. Division of Medical Microbiology, Dept of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.Children's Health and Environment Program, Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, Australia.Dept of Paediatrics and Child Health, Tygerberg Children's Hospital, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.Division of Medical Microbiology, Dept of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. National Health Laboratory Service, Cape Town, South Africa.Dept of Paediatrics and Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, and SAMRC Unit on Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30740462

Citation

Vanker, Aneesa, et al. "Indoor Air Pollution and Tobacco Smoke Exposure: Impact On Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Carriage in Mothers and Infants in an African Birth Cohort Study." ERJ Open Research, vol. 5, no. 1, 2019.
Vanker A, Nduru PM, Barnett W, et al. Indoor air pollution and tobacco smoke exposure: impact on nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage in mothers and infants in an African birth cohort study. ERJ Open Res. 2019;5(1).
Vanker, A., Nduru, P. M., Barnett, W., Dube, F. S., Sly, P. D., Gie, R. P., ... Zar, H. J. (2019). Indoor air pollution and tobacco smoke exposure: impact on nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage in mothers and infants in an African birth cohort study. ERJ Open Research, 5(1), doi:10.1183/23120541.00052-2018.
Vanker A, et al. Indoor Air Pollution and Tobacco Smoke Exposure: Impact On Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Carriage in Mothers and Infants in an African Birth Cohort Study. ERJ Open Res. 2019;5(1) PubMed PMID: 30740462.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Indoor air pollution and tobacco smoke exposure: impact on nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage in mothers and infants in an African birth cohort study. AU - Vanker,Aneesa, AU - Nduru,Polite M, AU - Barnett,Whitney, AU - Dube,Felix S, AU - Sly,Peter D, AU - Gie,Robert P, AU - Nicol,Mark P, AU - Zar,Heather J, Y1 - 2019/02/04/ PY - 2018/04/04/received PY - 2018/11/19/accepted PY - 2019/2/12/entrez PY - 2019/2/12/pubmed PY - 2019/2/12/medline JF - ERJ open research JO - ERJ Open Res VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - Indoor air pollution (IAP) or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure may influence nasopharyngeal carriage of bacterial species and development of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). The aim of this study was to longitudinally investigate the impact of antenatal or postnatal IAP/ETS exposure on nasopharyngeal bacteria in mothers and infants. A South African cohort study followed mother-infant pairs from birth through the first year. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken at birth, 6 and 12 months for bacterial culture. Multivariable and multivariate Poisson regression investigated associations between nasopharyngeal bacterial species and IAP/ETS. IAP exposures (particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, volatile organic compounds) were measured at home visits. ETS exposure was measured through maternal and infant urine cotinine. Infants received the 13-valent pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae B conjugate vaccines. There were 881 maternal and 2605 infant nasopharyngeal swabs. Antenatal ETS exposure was associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae carriage in mothers (adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.73 (95% CI 1.03-2.92)) while postnatal ETS exposure was associated with carriage in infants (aRR 1.14 (95% CI 1.00-1.30)) Postnatal particulate matter exposure was associated with the nasopharyngeal carriage of H. influenzae (aRR 1.68 (95% CI 1.10- 2.57)) or Moraxella catarrhalis (aRR 1.42 (95% CI 1.03-1.97)) in infants. Early-life environmental exposures are associated with an increased prevalence of specific nasopharyngeal bacteria during infancy, which may predispose to LRTI. SN - 2312-0541 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30740462/Indoor_air_pollution_and_tobacco_smoke_exposure:_impact_on_nasopharyngeal_bacterial_carriage_in_mothers_and_infants_in_an_African_birth_cohort_study_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30740462/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -