Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The impact of paralytic bovine rabies transmitted by vampire bats in Latin America and the Caribbean.
Rev Sci Tech. 2018 Aug; 37(2):451-459.RS

Abstract

The effective control of dog rabies in Latin America is justifiably seen as a major success in the struggle to limit this devastating zoonosis. However, rabies remains a problem, due to the presence of the virus in bat populations throughout the region, including vampire bats. Vampire bats obtain nutrition exclusively through consuming blood by biting mammals and birds. This makes the species a highly efficient vector of the rabies virus, responsible for sporadic outbreaks of rabies in human populations and numerous cases of rabies in livestock. This, in turn, causes economic losses to the farming industry in countries throughout the region. For over four decades, efforts to control rabies have been directed at controlling the reservoir species and vaccinating cattle. However, this approach has not eliminated rabies in livestock. A major barrier to innovation in vampire rabies control is a lack of consistent surveillance to establish the extent of the problem. This precludes any calculation of its cost to the economy or the cost of potential solutions, such as vaccinating livestock. This paper outlines the problem of livestock rabies in Latin America and considers factors that influence the economic cost of potential solutions to this continuing challenge to human and livestock health.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30747135

Citation

Johnson, N, and J A. Montano Hirose. "The Impact of Paralytic Bovine Rabies Transmitted By Vampire Bats in Latin America and the Caribbean." Revue Scientifique Et Technique (International Office of Epizootics), vol. 37, no. 2, 2018, pp. 451-459.
Johnson N, Montano Hirose JA. The impact of paralytic bovine rabies transmitted by vampire bats in Latin America and the Caribbean. Rev Sci Tech. 2018;37(2):451-459.
Johnson, N., & Montano Hirose, J. A. (2018). The impact of paralytic bovine rabies transmitted by vampire bats in Latin America and the Caribbean. Revue Scientifique Et Technique (International Office of Epizootics), 37(2), 451-459. https://doi.org/10.20506/rst.37.2.2814
Johnson N, Montano Hirose JA. The Impact of Paralytic Bovine Rabies Transmitted By Vampire Bats in Latin America and the Caribbean. Rev Sci Tech. 2018;37(2):451-459. PubMed PMID: 30747135.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of paralytic bovine rabies transmitted by vampire bats in Latin America and the Caribbean. AU - Johnson,N, AU - Montano Hirose,J A, PY - 2019/2/13/entrez PY - 2019/2/13/pubmed PY - 2019/3/15/medline KW - Bovine paralytic rabies KW - Caribbean KW - Control KW - Latin America KW - Rabies KW - Vaccination KW - Vampire bat SP - 451 EP - 459 JF - Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics) JO - Rev Sci Tech VL - 37 IS - 2 N2 - The effective control of dog rabies in Latin America is justifiably seen as a major success in the struggle to limit this devastating zoonosis. However, rabies remains a problem, due to the presence of the virus in bat populations throughout the region, including vampire bats. Vampire bats obtain nutrition exclusively through consuming blood by biting mammals and birds. This makes the species a highly efficient vector of the rabies virus, responsible for sporadic outbreaks of rabies in human populations and numerous cases of rabies in livestock. This, in turn, causes economic losses to the farming industry in countries throughout the region. For over four decades, efforts to control rabies have been directed at controlling the reservoir species and vaccinating cattle. However, this approach has not eliminated rabies in livestock. A major barrier to innovation in vampire rabies control is a lack of consistent surveillance to establish the extent of the problem. This precludes any calculation of its cost to the economy or the cost of potential solutions, such as vaccinating livestock. This paper outlines the problem of livestock rabies in Latin America and considers factors that influence the economic cost of potential solutions to this continuing challenge to human and livestock health. SN - 0253-1933 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30747135/The_impact_of_paralytic_bovine_rabies_transmitted_by_vampire_bats_in_Latin_America_and_the_Caribbean_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.20506/rst.37.2.2814 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -