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Counselling training for speech-language therapists working with people affected by post-stroke aphasia: a systematic review.
Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2019 05; 54(3):321-346.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Speech-language therapists use counselling to address the psychological well-being of people affected by post-stroke aphasia. Speech-language therapists report low counselling knowledge, skill and confidence for working in post-stroke aphasia which may be related to a lack of counselling training specific to the needs of this client group.

AIMS

To identify current training in counselling for speech-language therapists to address psychological well-being in people affected by post-stroke aphasia. Specifically, the intent was to establish the objectives, content, amount, teaching methods and outcomes of counselling training provided to speech-language therapists working with people affected by post-stroke aphasia.

METHODS & PROCEDURES

Eleven databases were searched from inception to January 2018 using terms relating to counselling, psychological well-being, speech-language therapy, stroke, aphasia and training. Studies using any research methodology and design were included. Nine studies were critically appraised and synthesized as a systematic review using the Search, AppraisaL, Synthesis and Analysis (SALSA) framework.

MAIN CONTRIBUTION

Information on counselling training came from the UK, United States and Australia. Student speech-language therapists received training in goal-setting and generic counselling skills. After qualification, speech-language therapists received counselling training from mental health professionals within stroke workplaces, from external providers and further education. A range of teaching techniques and counselling approaches were described. Self-report and themes from qualitative data were the primary measures of counselling training outcomes. Moderate correlations were reported between counselling training and levels of speech-language therapists' knowledge, comfort, confidence and preparedness to counsel people affected by post-stroke aphasia.

CONCLUSIONS

Research in counselling training for speech-language therapists working in post-stroke aphasia is limited, with a small number of primarily low-quality studies available. Training in generic counselling skills and brief psychological approaches with support from mental health professionals in the stroke workplace enabled speech-language therapists to feel knowledgeable, skilled and confident to address the psychological well-being of people affected by post-stroke aphasia. Evidence about the effectiveness of counselling training on speech-language therapists' confidence and competence in practice and on client outcomes in psychological well-being in post-stroke aphasia is required.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Discipline of Speech Pathology, School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia.Discipline of Speech Pathology, School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia.Discipline of Clinical Psychology, Graduate School of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia.Discipline of Speech Pathology, School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30758112

Citation

Sekhon, Jasvinder K., et al. "Counselling Training for Speech-language Therapists Working With People Affected By Post-stroke Aphasia: a Systematic Review." International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, vol. 54, no. 3, 2019, pp. 321-346.
Sekhon JK, Oates J, Kneebone I, et al. Counselling training for speech-language therapists working with people affected by post-stroke aphasia: a systematic review. Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2019;54(3):321-346.
Sekhon, J. K., Oates, J., Kneebone, I., & Rose, M. (2019). Counselling training for speech-language therapists working with people affected by post-stroke aphasia: a systematic review. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 54(3), 321-346. https://doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12455
Sekhon JK, et al. Counselling Training for Speech-language Therapists Working With People Affected By Post-stroke Aphasia: a Systematic Review. Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2019;54(3):321-346. PubMed PMID: 30758112.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Counselling training for speech-language therapists working with people affected by post-stroke aphasia: a systematic review. AU - Sekhon,Jasvinder K, AU - Oates,Jennifer, AU - Kneebone,Ian, AU - Rose,Miranda, Y1 - 2019/02/13/ PY - 2018/01/23/received PY - 2018/12/23/revised PY - 2019/01/09/accepted PY - 2019/2/14/pubmed PY - 2020/2/6/medline PY - 2019/2/14/entrez KW - aphasia KW - counselling KW - psychological well-being KW - speech-language therapy KW - stroke KW - training SP - 321 EP - 346 JF - International journal of language & communication disorders JO - Int J Lang Commun Disord VL - 54 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Speech-language therapists use counselling to address the psychological well-being of people affected by post-stroke aphasia. Speech-language therapists report low counselling knowledge, skill and confidence for working in post-stroke aphasia which may be related to a lack of counselling training specific to the needs of this client group. AIMS: To identify current training in counselling for speech-language therapists to address psychological well-being in people affected by post-stroke aphasia. Specifically, the intent was to establish the objectives, content, amount, teaching methods and outcomes of counselling training provided to speech-language therapists working with people affected by post-stroke aphasia. METHODS & PROCEDURES: Eleven databases were searched from inception to January 2018 using terms relating to counselling, psychological well-being, speech-language therapy, stroke, aphasia and training. Studies using any research methodology and design were included. Nine studies were critically appraised and synthesized as a systematic review using the Search, AppraisaL, Synthesis and Analysis (SALSA) framework. MAIN CONTRIBUTION: Information on counselling training came from the UK, United States and Australia. Student speech-language therapists received training in goal-setting and generic counselling skills. After qualification, speech-language therapists received counselling training from mental health professionals within stroke workplaces, from external providers and further education. A range of teaching techniques and counselling approaches were described. Self-report and themes from qualitative data were the primary measures of counselling training outcomes. Moderate correlations were reported between counselling training and levels of speech-language therapists' knowledge, comfort, confidence and preparedness to counsel people affected by post-stroke aphasia. CONCLUSIONS: Research in counselling training for speech-language therapists working in post-stroke aphasia is limited, with a small number of primarily low-quality studies available. Training in generic counselling skills and brief psychological approaches with support from mental health professionals in the stroke workplace enabled speech-language therapists to feel knowledgeable, skilled and confident to address the psychological well-being of people affected by post-stroke aphasia. Evidence about the effectiveness of counselling training on speech-language therapists' confidence and competence in practice and on client outcomes in psychological well-being in post-stroke aphasia is required. SN - 1460-6984 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30758112/Counselling_training_for_speech_language_therapists_working_with_people_affected_by_post_stroke_aphasia:_a_systematic_review_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12455 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -