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Dissociation of memory signals for metamemory in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).
Anim Cogn. 2019 May; 22(3):331-341.AC

Abstract

Some nonhuman species demonstrate metamemory, the ability to monitor and control memory. Here, we identify memory signals that control metamemory judgments in rhesus monkeys by directly comparing performance in two metamemory paradigms while holding the availability of one memory signal constant and manipulating another. Monkeys performed a four-choice match-to-sample memory task. In Experiment 1, monkeys could decline memory tests on some trials for a small, guaranteed reward. In Experiment 2, monkeys could review the sample on some trials. In both experiments, monkeys improved accuracy by selectively declining tests or reviewing samples when memory was poor. To assess the degree to which different memory signals made independent contributions to the metamemory judgement, we made the decline-test or review-sample response available either prospectively, before the test, or concurrently with test stimuli. Prospective metamemory judgements are likely controlled by the current contents of working memory, whereas concurrent metamemory judgements may also be controlled by additional relative familiarity signals evoked by the sight of the test stimuli. In both paradigms, metacognitive responding enhanced accuracy more on concurrent than on prospective tests, suggesting additive contributions of working memory and stimulus-evoked familiarity. Consistent with the hypothesis that working memory and stimulus-evoked familiarity both control metamemory judgments when available, metacognitive choice latencies were longer in the concurrent condition, when both were available. Together, these data demonstrate that multiple memory signals can additively control metacognitive judgements in monkeys and provide a framework for mapping the interaction of explicit memory signals in primate memory.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, 36 Eagle Row, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. emily.brown@emory.edu.Laboratory of Neuropsychology, NIMH, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.Department of Psychology, Providence College, Providence, RI, USA.Department of Psychology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, 36 Eagle Row, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30762160

Citation

Brown, Emily Kathryn, et al. "Dissociation of Memory Signals for Metamemory in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta)." Animal Cognition, vol. 22, no. 3, 2019, pp. 331-341.
Brown EK, Basile BM, Templer VL, et al. Dissociation of memory signals for metamemory in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Anim Cogn. 2019;22(3):331-341.
Brown, E. K., Basile, B. M., Templer, V. L., & Hampton, R. R. (2019). Dissociation of memory signals for metamemory in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Animal Cognition, 22(3), 331-341. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-019-01246-5
Brown EK, et al. Dissociation of Memory Signals for Metamemory in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta). Anim Cogn. 2019;22(3):331-341. PubMed PMID: 30762160.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dissociation of memory signals for metamemory in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). AU - Brown,Emily Kathryn, AU - Basile,Benjamin M, AU - Templer,Victoria L, AU - Hampton,Robert R, Y1 - 2019/02/14/ PY - 2018/08/19/received PY - 2019/01/31/accepted PY - 2019/01/28/revised PY - 2019/2/15/pubmed PY - 2019/9/24/medline PY - 2019/2/15/entrez KW - Familiarity KW - Information seeking KW - Metacognition KW - Monitoring KW - Working memory SP - 331 EP - 341 JF - Animal cognition JO - Anim Cogn VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - Some nonhuman species demonstrate metamemory, the ability to monitor and control memory. Here, we identify memory signals that control metamemory judgments in rhesus monkeys by directly comparing performance in two metamemory paradigms while holding the availability of one memory signal constant and manipulating another. Monkeys performed a four-choice match-to-sample memory task. In Experiment 1, monkeys could decline memory tests on some trials for a small, guaranteed reward. In Experiment 2, monkeys could review the sample on some trials. In both experiments, monkeys improved accuracy by selectively declining tests or reviewing samples when memory was poor. To assess the degree to which different memory signals made independent contributions to the metamemory judgement, we made the decline-test or review-sample response available either prospectively, before the test, or concurrently with test stimuli. Prospective metamemory judgements are likely controlled by the current contents of working memory, whereas concurrent metamemory judgements may also be controlled by additional relative familiarity signals evoked by the sight of the test stimuli. In both paradigms, metacognitive responding enhanced accuracy more on concurrent than on prospective tests, suggesting additive contributions of working memory and stimulus-evoked familiarity. Consistent with the hypothesis that working memory and stimulus-evoked familiarity both control metamemory judgments when available, metacognitive choice latencies were longer in the concurrent condition, when both were available. Together, these data demonstrate that multiple memory signals can additively control metacognitive judgements in monkeys and provide a framework for mapping the interaction of explicit memory signals in primate memory. SN - 1435-9456 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30762160/Dissociation_of_memory_signals_for_metamemory_in_rhesus_monkeys__Macaca_mulatta__ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -