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Are hybrid sit-stand postures a good compromise between sitting and standing?
Ergonomics. 2019 Jun; 62(6):811-822.E

Abstract

Potential alternatives for conventional sitting and standing postures are hybrid sit-stand postures (i.e. perching). The purposes of this study were (i) to identify where lumbopelvic and pelvic angles deviate from sitting and standing and (ii) to use these breakpoints to define three distinct postural phases: sitting, perching, and standing, in order to examine differences in muscle activations and ground reaction forces between phases. Twenty-four participants completed 19 1-min static trials, from sitting (90°) to standing (180°), sequentially in 5°trunk-thigh angle increments. The perching phase was determined to be 145-175° for males and 160-175° for females. For both sexes, knee extensor activity was lower in standing compared to perching or sitting (p < .01). Anterior-posterior forces were the highest in perching (p < .001), requiring ∼15% of body-weight. Chair designs aimed at reducing the lower limb demands within 115-170° trunk-thigh angle may improve the feasibility of sustaining the perched posture. Practitioner summary: Individuals who develop low back pain in sitting or standing may benefit from hybrid sit-stand postures (perching), yet kinematic and kinetic changes associated with these postures have not been investigated. Perching can improve lumbar posture at a cost of increased lower limb demands, suggesting potential avenues for chair design improvement. Abbreviations: A/P: anterior-posterior; M/L: medial-lateral; LBP: low back pain; EMG: electromyography; TES: thoracic erector spinae; LES: lumbar erector spinae; VMO: vastus medialis obliquus; MVC: maximum voluntary contraction; ASIS: anterior superior iliac spine; PSIS: posterior superior iliac spine; BW: body weight; RMSE: root mean square error; SD: standard deviation; ROM: range of motion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Kinesiology , University of Waterloo , Waterloo , Ontario , Canada.a Department of Kinesiology , University of Waterloo , Waterloo , Ontario , Canada.a Department of Kinesiology , University of Waterloo , Waterloo , Ontario , Canada.b Department of Mathematics , Western Washington University , Bellingham , Washington , USA.a Department of Kinesiology , University of Waterloo , Waterloo , Ontario , Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30763145

Citation

Noguchi, Mamiko, et al. "Are Hybrid Sit-stand Postures a Good Compromise Between Sitting and Standing?" Ergonomics, vol. 62, no. 6, 2019, pp. 811-822.
Noguchi M, Glinka M, Mayberry GR, et al. Are hybrid sit-stand postures a good compromise between sitting and standing? Ergonomics. 2019;62(6):811-822.
Noguchi, M., Glinka, M., Mayberry, G. R., Noguchi, K., & Callaghan, J. P. (2019). Are hybrid sit-stand postures a good compromise between sitting and standing? Ergonomics, 62(6), 811-822. https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2019.1577496
Noguchi M, et al. Are Hybrid Sit-stand Postures a Good Compromise Between Sitting and Standing. Ergonomics. 2019;62(6):811-822. PubMed PMID: 30763145.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are hybrid sit-stand postures a good compromise between sitting and standing? AU - Noguchi,Mamiko, AU - Glinka,Michal, AU - Mayberry,Graham R, AU - Noguchi,Kimihiro, AU - Callaghan,Jack P, Y1 - 2019/03/05/ PY - 2019/2/15/pubmed PY - 2020/1/1/medline PY - 2019/2/15/entrez KW - Ergonomics KW - chair design KW - low back pain KW - lumbopelvic angles KW - perching SP - 811 EP - 822 JF - Ergonomics JO - Ergonomics VL - 62 IS - 6 N2 - Potential alternatives for conventional sitting and standing postures are hybrid sit-stand postures (i.e. perching). The purposes of this study were (i) to identify where lumbopelvic and pelvic angles deviate from sitting and standing and (ii) to use these breakpoints to define three distinct postural phases: sitting, perching, and standing, in order to examine differences in muscle activations and ground reaction forces between phases. Twenty-four participants completed 19 1-min static trials, from sitting (90°) to standing (180°), sequentially in 5°trunk-thigh angle increments. The perching phase was determined to be 145-175° for males and 160-175° for females. For both sexes, knee extensor activity was lower in standing compared to perching or sitting (p < .01). Anterior-posterior forces were the highest in perching (p < .001), requiring ∼15% of body-weight. Chair designs aimed at reducing the lower limb demands within 115-170° trunk-thigh angle may improve the feasibility of sustaining the perched posture. Practitioner summary: Individuals who develop low back pain in sitting or standing may benefit from hybrid sit-stand postures (perching), yet kinematic and kinetic changes associated with these postures have not been investigated. Perching can improve lumbar posture at a cost of increased lower limb demands, suggesting potential avenues for chair design improvement. Abbreviations: A/P: anterior-posterior; M/L: medial-lateral; LBP: low back pain; EMG: electromyography; TES: thoracic erector spinae; LES: lumbar erector spinae; VMO: vastus medialis obliquus; MVC: maximum voluntary contraction; ASIS: anterior superior iliac spine; PSIS: posterior superior iliac spine; BW: body weight; RMSE: root mean square error; SD: standard deviation; ROM: range of motion. SN - 1366-5847 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30763145/Are_hybrid_sit_stand_postures_a_good_compromise_between_sitting_and_standing DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -