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Early lead exposure and pubertal development in a Mexico City population.
Environ Int. 2019 04; 125:445-451.EI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies have examined the association between blood lead levels and pubertal timing in adolescent girls; however, the evidence is lacking on the role of lead exposure during sensitive developmental periods on sexual maturation.

OBJECTIVES

To examine the association of prenatal and early childhood lead exposure with pubertal stages among 264 boys and 283 girls aged 9.8-18.0 years in Mexico City.

METHODS

We measured maternal bone lead (a proxy for cumulative fetal exposure to lead from maternal bone stores mobilized during pregnancy) at 1 month postpartum. Blood lead was measured annually from 1 to 4 years. Pubertal stage was assessed by a pediatrician. We examined the association between lead and pubertal stages of breast, pubic hair and genitalia using ordinal regression. Age at menarche was evaluated using Cox proportional-hazard models.

RESULTS

Multivariate models showed that maternal patella lead and early childhood blood lead were inversely associated with breast growth (patella OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.51-1.00; blood OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.53-0.93) in girls. Girls with maternal patella lead in the 3rd tertile and child blood lead in the 2nd tertile had a later age at menarche compared with girls in the 1st tertile (patella HR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41-0.88; blood HR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.91). Additionally, early childhood blood lead was negatively associated with pubic hair growth (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51-0.90) in girls. No associations were found in boys.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that higher prenatal and early childhood exposure to lead may be associated with delayed pubertal development in girls but not boys. Our findings are consistent with previous analyses and reinforce the reproductive effects of lead for girls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. Electronic address: mmtellez@insp.mx.Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.Centro de Investigacion en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico.Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Occupational and Environmental Health, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30763831

Citation

Liu, Yun, et al. "Early Lead Exposure and Pubertal Development in a Mexico City Population." Environment International, vol. 125, 2019, pp. 445-451.
Liu Y, Téllez-Rojo MM, Sánchez BN, et al. Early lead exposure and pubertal development in a Mexico City population. Environ Int. 2019;125:445-451.
Liu, Y., Téllez-Rojo, M. M., Sánchez, B. N., Zhang, Z., Afeiche, M. C., Mercado-García, A., Hu, H., Meeker, J. D., & Peterson, K. E. (2019). Early lead exposure and pubertal development in a Mexico City population. Environment International, 125, 445-451. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.02.021
Liu Y, et al. Early Lead Exposure and Pubertal Development in a Mexico City Population. Environ Int. 2019;125:445-451. PubMed PMID: 30763831.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early lead exposure and pubertal development in a Mexico City population. AU - Liu,Yun, AU - Téllez-Rojo,Martha M, AU - Sánchez,Brisa N, AU - Zhang,Zhenzhen, AU - Afeiche,Myriam C, AU - Mercado-García,Adrianna, AU - Hu,Howard, AU - Meeker,John D, AU - Peterson,Karen E, Y1 - 2019/02/11/ PY - 2018/11/04/received PY - 2019/01/14/revised PY - 2019/02/06/accepted PY - 2019/2/15/pubmed PY - 2019/10/31/medline PY - 2019/2/15/entrez KW - Age at menarche KW - Blood lead KW - Bone lead KW - Early childhood KW - Pregnancy KW - Puberty SP - 445 EP - 451 JF - Environment international JO - Environ Int VL - 125 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies have examined the association between blood lead levels and pubertal timing in adolescent girls; however, the evidence is lacking on the role of lead exposure during sensitive developmental periods on sexual maturation. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of prenatal and early childhood lead exposure with pubertal stages among 264 boys and 283 girls aged 9.8-18.0 years in Mexico City. METHODS: We measured maternal bone lead (a proxy for cumulative fetal exposure to lead from maternal bone stores mobilized during pregnancy) at 1 month postpartum. Blood lead was measured annually from 1 to 4 years. Pubertal stage was assessed by a pediatrician. We examined the association between lead and pubertal stages of breast, pubic hair and genitalia using ordinal regression. Age at menarche was evaluated using Cox proportional-hazard models. RESULTS: Multivariate models showed that maternal patella lead and early childhood blood lead were inversely associated with breast growth (patella OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.51-1.00; blood OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.53-0.93) in girls. Girls with maternal patella lead in the 3rd tertile and child blood lead in the 2nd tertile had a later age at menarche compared with girls in the 1st tertile (patella HR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41-0.88; blood HR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.91). Additionally, early childhood blood lead was negatively associated with pubic hair growth (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.51-0.90) in girls. No associations were found in boys. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that higher prenatal and early childhood exposure to lead may be associated with delayed pubertal development in girls but not boys. Our findings are consistent with previous analyses and reinforce the reproductive effects of lead for girls. SN - 1873-6750 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30763831/Early_lead_exposure_and_pubertal_development_in_a_Mexico_City_population_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-4120(18)32589-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -