Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

E-cigarettes and Smoking Cessation in the United States According to Frequency of E-cigarette Use and Quitting Duration: Analysis of the 2016 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys.
Nicotine Tob Res. 2020 04 21; 22(5):655-662.NT

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use and smoking cessation among US adults. Duration of smoking cessation was taken into consideration because e-cigarette awareness and use were low in the United States before 2010.

METHODS

A pooled analysis of the 2016 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys on current (N = 9935) and former smokers (N = 14 754) was performed. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs), for sociodemographic factors, were calculated.

FINDINGS

Current e-cigarette use was reported by 10.5% (95% CI = 9.8% to 11.3%) of current smokers and 4.5% (95% CI = 4.0% to 5.0%) of former smokers. Prevalence was high in former smokers of less than 1 year (16.8%, 95% CI = 13.9% to 20.2%), 1-3 years (15.0%, 95% CI = 13.0% to 17.3%), and 4-6 years (10.5%, 95% CI = 8.6% to 12.7%), and very low in former smokers of more than 6 years (0.7%, 95% CI = 0.5% to 0.9%). Similar patterns were observed for daily e-cigarette use. Current e-cigarette use was negatively associated with being a former smoker when quit duration was ignored (aPR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.59 to 0.69) but was positively associated with being a former smoker of less than 1 year (aPR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.84) and 1-3 years (aPR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.42). Daily e-cigarette use was not associated with being a former smoker when quit duration was ignored but was positively associated with being a former smoker of less than 1 year (aPR = 3.44, 95% CI = 2.63 to 4.49), 1-3 years (aPR = 2.51, 95% CI = 2.13 to 2.95), and 4-6 years (aPR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.49 to 2.26).

CONCLUSIONS

Daily e-cigarette use is strongly associated with recent smoking cessation (≤6 years) among US adults. Frequency of e-cigarette use and smoking cessation duration are important parameters when analyzing the effects of e-cigarettes in population surveys.

IMPLICATIONS

There is controversy on whether e-cigarettes promote or prevent smoking cessation. This study presents a detailed analysis of the association between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation in the United States considering frequency of e-cigarette use and duration of smoking cessation. The latter was considered appropriate because e-cigarette awareness and use were low in the United States before 2010. Daily e-cigarette use is strongly associated with recent (≤6 years) smoking cessation in the United States. Both frequency of e-cigarette use and duration of smoking cessation are important factors in determining the effects of e-cigarettes in population studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Kallithea, Greece. Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Patras, Greece. Department of Public and Administrative Health, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.Department of Social and Behavioral Science, College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, NY. Department of Epidemiology, College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, NY.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30768136

Citation

Farsalinos, Konstantinos E., and Raymond Niaura. "E-cigarettes and Smoking Cessation in the United States According to Frequency of E-cigarette Use and Quitting Duration: Analysis of the 2016 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys." Nicotine & Tobacco Research : Official Journal of the Society for Research On Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 22, no. 5, 2020, pp. 655-662.
Farsalinos KE, Niaura R. E-cigarettes and Smoking Cessation in the United States According to Frequency of E-cigarette Use and Quitting Duration: Analysis of the 2016 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys. Nicotine Tob Res. 2020;22(5):655-662.
Farsalinos, K. E., & Niaura, R. (2020). E-cigarettes and Smoking Cessation in the United States According to Frequency of E-cigarette Use and Quitting Duration: Analysis of the 2016 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys. Nicotine & Tobacco Research : Official Journal of the Society for Research On Nicotine and Tobacco, 22(5), 655-662. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntz025
Farsalinos KE, Niaura R. E-cigarettes and Smoking Cessation in the United States According to Frequency of E-cigarette Use and Quitting Duration: Analysis of the 2016 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys. Nicotine Tob Res. 2020 04 21;22(5):655-662. PubMed PMID: 30768136.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - E-cigarettes and Smoking Cessation in the United States According to Frequency of E-cigarette Use and Quitting Duration: Analysis of the 2016 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys. AU - Farsalinos,Konstantinos E, AU - Niaura,Raymond, PY - 2018/12/10/received PY - 2019/02/12/accepted PY - 2019/2/16/pubmed PY - 2020/8/14/medline PY - 2019/2/16/entrez SP - 655 EP - 662 JF - Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco JO - Nicotine Tob Res VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use and smoking cessation among US adults. Duration of smoking cessation was taken into consideration because e-cigarette awareness and use were low in the United States before 2010. METHODS: A pooled analysis of the 2016 and 2017 National Health Interview Surveys on current (N = 9935) and former smokers (N = 14 754) was performed. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs), for sociodemographic factors, were calculated. FINDINGS: Current e-cigarette use was reported by 10.5% (95% CI = 9.8% to 11.3%) of current smokers and 4.5% (95% CI = 4.0% to 5.0%) of former smokers. Prevalence was high in former smokers of less than 1 year (16.8%, 95% CI = 13.9% to 20.2%), 1-3 years (15.0%, 95% CI = 13.0% to 17.3%), and 4-6 years (10.5%, 95% CI = 8.6% to 12.7%), and very low in former smokers of more than 6 years (0.7%, 95% CI = 0.5% to 0.9%). Similar patterns were observed for daily e-cigarette use. Current e-cigarette use was negatively associated with being a former smoker when quit duration was ignored (aPR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.59 to 0.69) but was positively associated with being a former smoker of less than 1 year (aPR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.84) and 1-3 years (aPR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.42). Daily e-cigarette use was not associated with being a former smoker when quit duration was ignored but was positively associated with being a former smoker of less than 1 year (aPR = 3.44, 95% CI = 2.63 to 4.49), 1-3 years (aPR = 2.51, 95% CI = 2.13 to 2.95), and 4-6 years (aPR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.49 to 2.26). CONCLUSIONS: Daily e-cigarette use is strongly associated with recent smoking cessation (≤6 years) among US adults. Frequency of e-cigarette use and smoking cessation duration are important parameters when analyzing the effects of e-cigarettes in population surveys. IMPLICATIONS: There is controversy on whether e-cigarettes promote or prevent smoking cessation. This study presents a detailed analysis of the association between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation in the United States considering frequency of e-cigarette use and duration of smoking cessation. The latter was considered appropriate because e-cigarette awareness and use were low in the United States before 2010. Daily e-cigarette use is strongly associated with recent (≤6 years) smoking cessation in the United States. Both frequency of e-cigarette use and duration of smoking cessation are important factors in determining the effects of e-cigarettes in population studies. SN - 1469-994X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30768136/E_cigarettes_and_Smoking_Cessation_in_the_United_States_According_to_Frequency_of_E_cigarette_Use_and_Quitting_Duration:_Analysis_of_the_2016_and_2017_National_Health_Interview_Surveys_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -