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Adolescent Victimization and Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors: A Genetically Sensitive Cohort Study.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 05; 58(5):506-513.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Victimized adolescents have an increased risk of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors. However, poor understanding of causal and non-causal mechanisms underlying this observed risk limits the development of interventions to prevent premature death in adolescents. This study tested whether pre-existing family-wide and individual vulnerabilities account for victimized adolescents' increased risk of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors.

METHOD

Participants were 2,232 British children followed from birth to 18 years of age as part of the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study. Adolescent victimization (maltreatment, neglect, sexual victimization, family violence, peer/sibling victimization, cyber victimization, and crime victimization) was assessed through interviews with participants and co-informant questionnaires at the 18-year assessment. Suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt in adolescence were assessed through interviews with participants at 18 years.

RESULTS

Victimized adolescents had an increased risk of suicidal ideation (odds ratio [OR] 2.40, 95% CI 2.11-2.74), self-harm (OR 2.38, 95% CI 2.10-2.69), and suicide attempt (OR 3.14, 95% CI 2.54-3.88). Co-twin control and propensity score matching analyses showed that these associations were largely accounted for by pre-existing familial and individual vulnerabilities, respectively. Over and above their prior vulnerabilities, victimized adolescents still showed a modest increase in risk for suicidal ideation (OR 1.45, 95%CI 1.10-1.91) and self-harm (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.18-1.91) but not for suicide attempt (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.83-1.98).

CONCLUSION

Risk for self-injurious thoughts and behaviors in victimized adolescents is explained only in part by the experience of victimization. Pre-existing vulnerabilities account for a large proportion of the risk. Therefore, effective interventions to prevent premature death in victimized adolescents should not only target the experience of victimization but also address pre-existing vulnerabilities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

King's College London, UK.King's College London, UK.King's College London, UK; Duke University.King's College London, UK; Duke University.King's College London, UK.Duke University, Durham, NC; University of California, Irvine.King's College London, UK.Duke University, Durham, NC.King's College London, UK.No affiliation info availableDuke University, Durham, NC.Graduate School of Education, The University of Tokyo, Japan.King's College London, UK; National and Specialist CAMHS Clinic for Trauma, Anxiety, and Depression, South London and the Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Electronic address: andrea.danese@kcl.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30768402

Citation

Baldwin, Jessie R., et al. "Adolescent Victimization and Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors: a Genetically Sensitive Cohort Study." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 58, no. 5, 2019, pp. 506-513.
Baldwin JR, Arseneault L, Caspi A, et al. Adolescent Victimization and Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors: A Genetically Sensitive Cohort Study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019;58(5):506-513.
Baldwin, J. R., Arseneault, L., Caspi, A., Moffitt, T. E., Fisher, H. L., Odgers, C. L., Ambler, A., Houts, R. M., Matthews, T., Ougrin, D., Richmond-Rakerd, L. S., Takizawa, R., & Danese, A. (2019). Adolescent Victimization and Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors: A Genetically Sensitive Cohort Study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 58(5), 506-513. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2018.07.903
Baldwin JR, et al. Adolescent Victimization and Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors: a Genetically Sensitive Cohort Study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019;58(5):506-513. PubMed PMID: 30768402.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adolescent Victimization and Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors: A Genetically Sensitive Cohort Study. AU - Baldwin,Jessie R, AU - Arseneault,Louise, AU - Caspi,Avshalom, AU - Moffitt,Terrie E, AU - Fisher,Helen L, AU - Odgers,Candice L, AU - Ambler,Antony, AU - Houts,Renate M, AU - Matthews,Timothy, AU - Ougrin,Dennis, AU - Richmond-Rakerd,Leah S, AU - Takizawa,Ryu, AU - Danese,Andrea, Y1 - 2018/12/12/ PY - 2018/04/12/received PY - 2018/06/07/revised PY - 2018/08/15/accepted PY - 2019/2/16/pubmed PY - 2020/5/12/medline PY - 2019/2/16/entrez KW - adolescence KW - self-harm KW - suicidal ideation KW - suicide attempt KW - victimization SP - 506 EP - 513 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry JO - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry VL - 58 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Victimized adolescents have an increased risk of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors. However, poor understanding of causal and non-causal mechanisms underlying this observed risk limits the development of interventions to prevent premature death in adolescents. This study tested whether pre-existing family-wide and individual vulnerabilities account for victimized adolescents' increased risk of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors. METHOD: Participants were 2,232 British children followed from birth to 18 years of age as part of the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study. Adolescent victimization (maltreatment, neglect, sexual victimization, family violence, peer/sibling victimization, cyber victimization, and crime victimization) was assessed through interviews with participants and co-informant questionnaires at the 18-year assessment. Suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt in adolescence were assessed through interviews with participants at 18 years. RESULTS: Victimized adolescents had an increased risk of suicidal ideation (odds ratio [OR] 2.40, 95% CI 2.11-2.74), self-harm (OR 2.38, 95% CI 2.10-2.69), and suicide attempt (OR 3.14, 95% CI 2.54-3.88). Co-twin control and propensity score matching analyses showed that these associations were largely accounted for by pre-existing familial and individual vulnerabilities, respectively. Over and above their prior vulnerabilities, victimized adolescents still showed a modest increase in risk for suicidal ideation (OR 1.45, 95%CI 1.10-1.91) and self-harm (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.18-1.91) but not for suicide attempt (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.83-1.98). CONCLUSION: Risk for self-injurious thoughts and behaviors in victimized adolescents is explained only in part by the experience of victimization. Pre-existing vulnerabilities account for a large proportion of the risk. Therefore, effective interventions to prevent premature death in victimized adolescents should not only target the experience of victimization but also address pre-existing vulnerabilities. SN - 1527-5418 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30768402/Adolescent_Victimization_and_Self_Injurious_Thoughts_and_Behaviors:_A_Genetically_Sensitive_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0890-8567(18)32033-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -