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Acute pain responses in dairy calves undergoing cornual nerve blocks with or without topical anesthetic.
J Dairy Sci 2019; 102(4):3431-3438JD

Abstract

Dairy calves are routinely administered medicines, vaccines, and anesthesia via injection. Although injections are painful, little is known about methods to alleviate this pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether lidocaine-prilocaine cream, a topical anesthetic, reduced calves' pain response to a subcutaneous injection around the cornual nerve. Calves were assigned 1 of 2 treatments: lidocaine-prilocaine cream at the sites of injection (n = 10) or no cream (n = 9). Thirty minutes after treatment, calves received a subcutaneous injection of 2% buffered lidocaine hydrochloride around the left and right cornual nerves. Contrary to our hypothesis, calves that received anesthetic cream beforehand displayed more escape behaviors during the injections than control calves. Both treatments had similarly low amounts of head-related behaviors afterward. Maximum eye temperature did not differ between the calves that received anesthetic cream and control calves, although eye temperature increased over time for both treatments. Heart rate increased during the 30 s following the first injection in both treatments. There were no treatment differences for any heart rate measures over the 5-min period after the first injection (mean heart rate, root mean square of successive differences, high-frequency power, and the ratio of low-frequency power to high-frequency power). These results suggest that cornual nerve blocks with buffered lidocaine are painful and that a lidocaine-prilocaine cream was not only ineffective in reducing this pain but that it may also worsen it.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Animal Welfare, Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis 95616.Center for Animal Welfare, Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis 95616.Center for Animal Welfare, Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis 95616. Electronic address: cbtucker@ucdavis.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial, Veterinary
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30772020

Citation

Jimenez, Reyna E., et al. "Acute Pain Responses in Dairy Calves Undergoing Cornual Nerve Blocks With or Without Topical Anesthetic." Journal of Dairy Science, vol. 102, no. 4, 2019, pp. 3431-3438.
Jimenez RE, Adcock SJJ, Tucker CB. Acute pain responses in dairy calves undergoing cornual nerve blocks with or without topical anesthetic. J Dairy Sci. 2019;102(4):3431-3438.
Jimenez, R. E., Adcock, S. J. J., & Tucker, C. B. (2019). Acute pain responses in dairy calves undergoing cornual nerve blocks with or without topical anesthetic. Journal of Dairy Science, 102(4), pp. 3431-3438. doi:10.3168/jds.2018-15445.
Jimenez RE, Adcock SJJ, Tucker CB. Acute Pain Responses in Dairy Calves Undergoing Cornual Nerve Blocks With or Without Topical Anesthetic. J Dairy Sci. 2019;102(4):3431-3438. PubMed PMID: 30772020.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute pain responses in dairy calves undergoing cornual nerve blocks with or without topical anesthetic. AU - Jimenez,Reyna E, AU - Adcock,Sarah J J, AU - Tucker,Cassandra B, Y1 - 2019/02/14/ PY - 2018/07/25/received PY - 2018/12/10/accepted PY - 2019/2/18/pubmed PY - 2019/9/4/medline PY - 2019/2/18/entrez KW - animal welfare KW - injection KW - lidocaine–prilocaine cream KW - local anesthesia SP - 3431 EP - 3438 JF - Journal of dairy science JO - J. Dairy Sci. VL - 102 IS - 4 N2 - Dairy calves are routinely administered medicines, vaccines, and anesthesia via injection. Although injections are painful, little is known about methods to alleviate this pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether lidocaine-prilocaine cream, a topical anesthetic, reduced calves' pain response to a subcutaneous injection around the cornual nerve. Calves were assigned 1 of 2 treatments: lidocaine-prilocaine cream at the sites of injection (n = 10) or no cream (n = 9). Thirty minutes after treatment, calves received a subcutaneous injection of 2% buffered lidocaine hydrochloride around the left and right cornual nerves. Contrary to our hypothesis, calves that received anesthetic cream beforehand displayed more escape behaviors during the injections than control calves. Both treatments had similarly low amounts of head-related behaviors afterward. Maximum eye temperature did not differ between the calves that received anesthetic cream and control calves, although eye temperature increased over time for both treatments. Heart rate increased during the 30 s following the first injection in both treatments. There were no treatment differences for any heart rate measures over the 5-min period after the first injection (mean heart rate, root mean square of successive differences, high-frequency power, and the ratio of low-frequency power to high-frequency power). These results suggest that cornual nerve blocks with buffered lidocaine are painful and that a lidocaine-prilocaine cream was not only ineffective in reducing this pain but that it may also worsen it. SN - 1525-3198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30772020/Acute_pain_responses_in_dairy_calves_undergoing_cornual_nerve_blocks_with_or_without_topical_anesthetic L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0302(19)30147-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -