Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Associations of demographic and clinical factors with depression over 2.5-years in an international prospective cohort of people living with MS.
Mult Scler Relat Disord 2019; 30:165-175MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Depression is highly prevalent among people with MS, and determinants thereof would be useful.

OBJECTIVES

We examined the relationship of demographic and clinical factors with positive depression-screen and change in depression over 2.5 years in people with MS.

METHODS

Positive depression-screen assessed by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-2 and PHQ-9. Associations of demographic and clinical factors with depression-screen and change thereof assessed using multivariable regression models, adjusted for age, sex, disability, fatigue, antidepressant use, and baseline PHQ-2, as appropriate.

RESULTS

Overweight/obese BMI, comorbidity number, fatigue, and disability were associated with positive depression-screen, while married/partnered state, being employed, higher perceived socioeconomic status, and greater education were inversely associated with depression-screen. After adjustment, only marital status, socioeconomic status, antidepressant medication use, and fatigue were associated with risk of newly positive depression-screen. MS type, relapse number and immunomodulatory medication use were not associated with depression-screen after controlling for disability and fatigue.

CONCLUSION

In a large prospective cohort study of depression in people with MS, we substantiated several potential determinants of a positive depression-screen and depression trajectory, particularly fatigue. Given that fatigue is the most common and most significant clinical symptom for people with MS, efforts to reduce fatigue may have follow-on benefits for reducing depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Electronic address: steve.simpson@unimelb.edu.au.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Psychiatry and Psychosocial Cancer Care, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Neuroepidemiology Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30785073

Citation

Simpson, Steve, et al. "Associations of Demographic and Clinical Factors With Depression Over 2.5-years in an International Prospective Cohort of People Living With MS." Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, vol. 30, 2019, pp. 165-175.
Simpson S, Taylor KL, Jelinek GA, et al. Associations of demographic and clinical factors with depression over 2.5-years in an international prospective cohort of people living with MS. Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2019;30:165-175.
Simpson, S., Taylor, K. L., Jelinek, G. A., De Livera, A. M., Brown, C. R., O'Kearney, E., ... Weiland, T. J. (2019). Associations of demographic and clinical factors with depression over 2.5-years in an international prospective cohort of people living with MS. Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, 30, pp. 165-175. doi:10.1016/j.msard.2019.02.014.
Simpson S, et al. Associations of Demographic and Clinical Factors With Depression Over 2.5-years in an International Prospective Cohort of People Living With MS. Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2019;30:165-175. PubMed PMID: 30785073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of demographic and clinical factors with depression over 2.5-years in an international prospective cohort of people living with MS. AU - Simpson,Steve,Jr AU - Taylor,Keryn L, AU - Jelinek,George A, AU - De Livera,Alysha M, AU - Brown,Chelsea R, AU - O'Kearney,Emily, AU - Neate,Sandra L, AU - Bevens,William, AU - Weiland,Tracey J, Y1 - 2019/02/11/ PY - 2018/12/04/received PY - 2019/01/23/revised PY - 2019/02/10/accepted PY - 2019/2/21/pubmed PY - 2019/8/10/medline PY - 2019/2/21/entrez KW - Clinical KW - Demographic KW - Depression KW - Epidemiology KW - Multiple sclerosis SP - 165 EP - 175 JF - Multiple sclerosis and related disorders JO - Mult Scler Relat Disord VL - 30 N2 - BACKGROUND: Depression is highly prevalent among people with MS, and determinants thereof would be useful. OBJECTIVES: We examined the relationship of demographic and clinical factors with positive depression-screen and change in depression over 2.5 years in people with MS. METHODS: Positive depression-screen assessed by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-2 and PHQ-9. Associations of demographic and clinical factors with depression-screen and change thereof assessed using multivariable regression models, adjusted for age, sex, disability, fatigue, antidepressant use, and baseline PHQ-2, as appropriate. RESULTS: Overweight/obese BMI, comorbidity number, fatigue, and disability were associated with positive depression-screen, while married/partnered state, being employed, higher perceived socioeconomic status, and greater education were inversely associated with depression-screen. After adjustment, only marital status, socioeconomic status, antidepressant medication use, and fatigue were associated with risk of newly positive depression-screen. MS type, relapse number and immunomodulatory medication use were not associated with depression-screen after controlling for disability and fatigue. CONCLUSION: In a large prospective cohort study of depression in people with MS, we substantiated several potential determinants of a positive depression-screen and depression trajectory, particularly fatigue. Given that fatigue is the most common and most significant clinical symptom for people with MS, efforts to reduce fatigue may have follow-on benefits for reducing depression. SN - 2211-0356 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30785073/Associations_of_demographic_and_clinical_factors_with_depression_over_2_5_years_in_an_international_prospective_cohort_of_people_living_with_MS_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2211-0348(19)30070-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -