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Release of silicone oil droplets from syringes.
Int J Retina Vitreous. 2019; 5:1.IJ

Abstract

Background

Intravitreal silicone oil droplets have been found in the vitreous. The aim of this study is to compare the rates of silicone oil released by different brands of commonly used syringes for intravitreal injection after agitation by flicking.

Methods

Three models of two brands of syringes were analyzed for their rates of silicone oil release: Saldanha Rodrigues (SR) 1 mL insulin syringe (SR, Brazil, syringe 1), Becton-Dickinson (BD) Plastipak 1 mL insulin syringe (Brazil, syringe 2), and BD Safety-Glide 1 mL insulin syringe (USA, syringe 3). All syringes were tested under four different conditions: positive control (fluid with addition of silicone oil) without agitation (group 1, n = 5); positive control with agitation (group 2, n = 3); fluid only without agitation (group 3, n = 5); and fluid only with agitation (group 4, n = 5). Masked graders performed all analyses using light microscopy.

Results

All syringes (1, 2, and 3) released silicone oil droplets in the positive control group regardless of the agitation status (groups 1 and 2). When no oil was added and the syringes were not agitated, only syringe 1 released silicone oil droplets (40% of samples). After agitation, syringes 1 and 3 released silicone oil droplets in all samples. Quantitative analysis showed a significantly (P = 0.011; 11.2 ± 2.9 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9, respectively) higher mean number of silicone oil droplets released by syringe 1 after agitation compared to no agitation. Syringe 1 also had significantly (P = 0.002, 11.2 ± 2.9 vs. 0.0 ± 0.0 vs. 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively) more droplets than syringes 2 and 3 after agitation.

Conclusions

Syringes commonly used for intravitreal injections frequently release silicone oil droplets when agitated by flicking, especially the SR insulin ones. We recommend that they not be agitated at the time of intravitreal injection and that the manufacturers consider producing syringes adapted for intraocular use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hospital de Olhos de Sergipe, Rua Campo do Brito, 995 São José, 49020-380 Aracaju, SE Brazil. 2Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP Brazil.Hospital de Olhos de Sergipe, Rua Campo do Brito, 995 São José, 49020-380 Aracaju, SE Brazil.Hospital de Olhos de Sergipe, Rua Campo do Brito, 995 São José, 49020-380 Aracaju, SE Brazil.Hospital de Olhos de Sergipe, Rua Campo do Brito, 995 São José, 49020-380 Aracaju, SE Brazil.Hospital de Olhos de Sergipe, Rua Campo do Brito, 995 São José, 49020-380 Aracaju, SE Brazil. 2Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP Brazil.3Brazilian Biosciences National Laboratory, Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials, Campinas, SP Brazil.2Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP Brazil.Retina Center of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN USA.2Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30788149

Citation

Melo, Gustavo Barreto, et al. "Release of Silicone Oil Droplets From Syringes." International Journal of Retina and Vitreous, vol. 5, 2019, p. 1.
Melo GB, Dias Junior CS, Carvalho MR, et al. Release of silicone oil droplets from syringes. Int J Retina Vitreous. 2019;5:1.
Melo, G. B., Dias Junior, C. S., Carvalho, M. R., Cardoso, A. L., Morais, F. B., Figueira, A. C. M., Lima Filho, A. A. S., Emerson, G. G., & Maia, M. (2019). Release of silicone oil droplets from syringes. International Journal of Retina and Vitreous, 5, 1. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40942-018-0153-8
Melo GB, et al. Release of Silicone Oil Droplets From Syringes. Int J Retina Vitreous. 2019;5:1. PubMed PMID: 30788149.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Release of silicone oil droplets from syringes. AU - Melo,Gustavo Barreto, AU - Dias Junior,Celso de Souza, AU - Carvalho,Mariana Reis, AU - Cardoso,Alexandre Lima, AU - Morais,Fábio Barreto, AU - Figueira,Ana Carolina Migliorini, AU - Lima Filho,Acácio Alves Souza, AU - Emerson,Geoffrey Guy, AU - Maia,Maurício, Y1 - 2019/01/03/ PY - 2018/12/02/received PY - 2018/12/24/accepted PY - 2019/2/22/entrez PY - 2019/2/23/pubmed PY - 2019/2/23/medline KW - Intravitreal injection KW - Silicone oil droplets KW - Syringe SP - 1 EP - 1 JF - International journal of retina and vitreous JO - Int J Retina Vitreous VL - 5 N2 - Background: Intravitreal silicone oil droplets have been found in the vitreous. The aim of this study is to compare the rates of silicone oil released by different brands of commonly used syringes for intravitreal injection after agitation by flicking. Methods: Three models of two brands of syringes were analyzed for their rates of silicone oil release: Saldanha Rodrigues (SR) 1 mL insulin syringe (SR, Brazil, syringe 1), Becton-Dickinson (BD) Plastipak 1 mL insulin syringe (Brazil, syringe 2), and BD Safety-Glide 1 mL insulin syringe (USA, syringe 3). All syringes were tested under four different conditions: positive control (fluid with addition of silicone oil) without agitation (group 1, n = 5); positive control with agitation (group 2, n = 3); fluid only without agitation (group 3, n = 5); and fluid only with agitation (group 4, n = 5). Masked graders performed all analyses using light microscopy. Results: All syringes (1, 2, and 3) released silicone oil droplets in the positive control group regardless of the agitation status (groups 1 and 2). When no oil was added and the syringes were not agitated, only syringe 1 released silicone oil droplets (40% of samples). After agitation, syringes 1 and 3 released silicone oil droplets in all samples. Quantitative analysis showed a significantly (P = 0.011; 11.2 ± 2.9 vs. 0.6 ± 0.9, respectively) higher mean number of silicone oil droplets released by syringe 1 after agitation compared to no agitation. Syringe 1 also had significantly (P = 0.002, 11.2 ± 2.9 vs. 0.0 ± 0.0 vs. 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively) more droplets than syringes 2 and 3 after agitation. Conclusions: Syringes commonly used for intravitreal injections frequently release silicone oil droplets when agitated by flicking, especially the SR insulin ones. We recommend that they not be agitated at the time of intravitreal injection and that the manufacturers consider producing syringes adapted for intraocular use. SN - 2056-9920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30788149/Release_of_silicone_oil_droplets_from_syringes_ L2 - https://journalretinavitreous.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40942-018-0153-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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