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Abnormal functional network centrality in drug-naïve boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Oct; 28(10):1321-1328.EC

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder in childhood and is characterized by inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Observations of distributed functional abnormalities in ADHD suggest aberrant large-scale brain network connectivity. However, few studies have measured the voxel-wise network centrality of boys with ADHD, which captures the functional relationships of a given voxel within the entire connectivity matrix of the brain. Here, to examine the network patterns characterizing children with ADHD, we recruited 47 boys with ADHD and 21 matched control boys who underwent resting-state functional imaging scanning in a 3.0 T MRI unit. We measured voxel-wise network centrality, indexing local functional relationships across the entire brain connectome, termed degree centrality (DC). Then, we chose the brain regions with altered DC as seeds to examine the remote functional connectivity (FC) of brain regions. We found that boys with ADHD exhibited (1) decreased centrality in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG) and increased centrality in the left superior occipital lobe (SOL) and right inferior parietal lobe (IPL); (2) decreased FC between the STG and the putamen and thalamus, which belong to the cognitive cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical (CSTC) loop, and increased FC between the STG and medial/superior frontal gyrus within the affective CSTC loop; and (3) decreased connectivity between the SOL and cuneus within the dorsal attention network. Our results demonstrated that patients with ADHD show a connectivity-based pathophysiological process in the cognitive and affective CSTC loops and attention network.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Huaxi MR Research Center (HMRRC), Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, People's Republic of China. Department of Radiology, The Third Hospital of Mianyang/Sichuan Mental Health Center, Mianyang, 621000, People's Republic of China. Center of Psychoradiology, The Third Hospital of Mianyang/Sichuan Mental Health Center, Mianyang, 621000, People's Republic of China.Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 325000, People's Republic of China.Huaxi MR Research Center (HMRRC), Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, People's Republic of China.Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 325000, People's Republic of China.Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 325000, People's Republic of China.Huaxi MR Research Center (HMRRC), Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, People's Republic of China.Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 325000, People's Republic of China.Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 325000, People's Republic of China.Huaxi MR Research Center (HMRRC), Department of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, People's Republic of China. julianahuang@163.com. Center of Psychoradiology, The Third Hospital of Mianyang/Sichuan Mental Health Center, Mianyang, 621000, People's Republic of China. julianahuang@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30798413

Citation

Zhou, Ming, et al. "Abnormal Functional Network Centrality in Drug-naïve Boys With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder." European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 28, no. 10, 2019, pp. 1321-1328.
Zhou M, Yang C, Bu X, et al. Abnormal functional network centrality in drug-naïve boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019;28(10):1321-1328.
Zhou, M., Yang, C., Bu, X., Liang, Y., Lin, H., Hu, X., Chen, H., Wang, M., & Huang, X. (2019). Abnormal functional network centrality in drug-naïve boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 28(10), 1321-1328. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-019-01297-6
Zhou M, et al. Abnormal Functional Network Centrality in Drug-naïve Boys With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019;28(10):1321-1328. PubMed PMID: 30798413.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Abnormal functional network centrality in drug-naïve boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. AU - Zhou,Ming, AU - Yang,Chuang, AU - Bu,Xuan, AU - Liang,Yan, AU - Lin,Haixi, AU - Hu,Xinyu, AU - Chen,Hong, AU - Wang,Meihao, AU - Huang,Xiaoqi, Y1 - 2019/02/23/ PY - 2018/08/26/received PY - 2019/02/18/accepted PY - 2019/2/25/pubmed PY - 2019/2/25/medline PY - 2019/2/25/entrez KW - ADHD KW - Degree centrality KW - Function connectivity KW - Resting-state fMRI SP - 1321 EP - 1328 JF - European child & adolescent psychiatry JO - Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry VL - 28 IS - 10 N2 - Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder in childhood and is characterized by inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Observations of distributed functional abnormalities in ADHD suggest aberrant large-scale brain network connectivity. However, few studies have measured the voxel-wise network centrality of boys with ADHD, which captures the functional relationships of a given voxel within the entire connectivity matrix of the brain. Here, to examine the network patterns characterizing children with ADHD, we recruited 47 boys with ADHD and 21 matched control boys who underwent resting-state functional imaging scanning in a 3.0 T MRI unit. We measured voxel-wise network centrality, indexing local functional relationships across the entire brain connectome, termed degree centrality (DC). Then, we chose the brain regions with altered DC as seeds to examine the remote functional connectivity (FC) of brain regions. We found that boys with ADHD exhibited (1) decreased centrality in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG) and increased centrality in the left superior occipital lobe (SOL) and right inferior parietal lobe (IPL); (2) decreased FC between the STG and the putamen and thalamus, which belong to the cognitive cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical (CSTC) loop, and increased FC between the STG and medial/superior frontal gyrus within the affective CSTC loop; and (3) decreased connectivity between the SOL and cuneus within the dorsal attention network. Our results demonstrated that patients with ADHD show a connectivity-based pathophysiological process in the cognitive and affective CSTC loops and attention network. SN - 1435-165X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30798413/Abnormal_functional_network_centrality_in_drug_naïve_boys_with_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00787-019-01297-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -