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No ethnic disparities in nutritional adequacy between the Indigenous Sami and the non-Sami population living in rural Northern Norway-the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey.
Nutr Res. 2019 04; 64:9-23.NR

Abstract

The diet of the Indigenous Sami people has become more Westernized. The lack of population-based data on nutrient intake and nutritional adequacy, in combination with a high prevalence of obesity/metabolic syndrome among Sami, was the rationale behind the present study. We hypothesized that differences in nutrient intake between Sami and non-Sami populations may still exist but that these differences are likely small, especially with respect to nutritional contributors to cardiometabolic health. We used cross-sectional data from the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014) to study nutrient intake, assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, in 2743 non-Sami, 622 multiethnic Sami, and 1139 Sami participants aged 40-69 years. We applied quantile regression to study ethnic and inland/coastal regional differences. The median intake of most nutrients met the Estimated Average Requirements of the 2012 Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. However, the average intake of saturated fatty acids and sodium was higher, and average intake of fiber was lower than recommended, regardless of ethnicity and geographic region. The diet of Sami vs non-Sami participants and participants from the inland vs coastal region contained significantly more iron and vitamin B12. We found a number of statistically significant ethnic differences in nutrient intake; however, many of these differences were small (3%-4%). We observed no ethnic disparities in nutritional adequacy between Sami and non-Sami populations living in rural Northern Norway. Our results suggest that, compared to the non-Sami, the Sami have a dietary intake that may reduce their risk of iron deficiency but not their cardiometabolic risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø The Arctic University of, Norway, Postboks 6050 Langnes, 9037 Tromsø.Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø The Arctic University of, Norway, Postboks 6050 Langnes, 9037 Tromsø.Centre for Sami Health Research, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø The Arctic University of Norway, Postboks 6050 Langnes, 9037 Tromsø.Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø The Arctic University of, Norway, Postboks 6050 Langnes, 9037 Tromsø. Electronic address: magritt.brustad@uit.no.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30802727

Citation

Petrenya, Natalia, et al. "No Ethnic Disparities in Nutritional Adequacy Between the Indigenous Sami and the non-Sami Population Living in Rural Northern Norway-the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 64, 2019, pp. 9-23.
Petrenya N, Skeie G, Melhus M, et al. No ethnic disparities in nutritional adequacy between the Indigenous Sami and the non-Sami population living in rural Northern Norway-the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey. Nutr Res. 2019;64:9-23.
Petrenya, N., Skeie, G., Melhus, M., & Brustad, M. (2019). No ethnic disparities in nutritional adequacy between the Indigenous Sami and the non-Sami population living in rural Northern Norway-the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 64, 9-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2018.12.010
Petrenya N, et al. No Ethnic Disparities in Nutritional Adequacy Between the Indigenous Sami and the non-Sami Population Living in Rural Northern Norway-the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey. Nutr Res. 2019;64:9-23. PubMed PMID: 30802727.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - No ethnic disparities in nutritional adequacy between the Indigenous Sami and the non-Sami population living in rural Northern Norway-the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey. AU - Petrenya,Natalia, AU - Skeie,Guri, AU - Melhus,Marita, AU - Brustad,Magritt, Y1 - 2018/12/28/ PY - 2018/03/15/received PY - 2018/12/11/revised PY - 2018/12/20/accepted PY - 2019/2/26/pubmed PY - 2020/5/7/medline PY - 2019/2/26/entrez KW - Ethnic comparison KW - Food frequency questionnaire KW - Indigenous KW - Norway KW - Nutrient intakes KW - Sami SP - 9 EP - 23 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 64 N2 - The diet of the Indigenous Sami people has become more Westernized. The lack of population-based data on nutrient intake and nutritional adequacy, in combination with a high prevalence of obesity/metabolic syndrome among Sami, was the rationale behind the present study. We hypothesized that differences in nutrient intake between Sami and non-Sami populations may still exist but that these differences are likely small, especially with respect to nutritional contributors to cardiometabolic health. We used cross-sectional data from the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014) to study nutrient intake, assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, in 2743 non-Sami, 622 multiethnic Sami, and 1139 Sami participants aged 40-69 years. We applied quantile regression to study ethnic and inland/coastal regional differences. The median intake of most nutrients met the Estimated Average Requirements of the 2012 Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. However, the average intake of saturated fatty acids and sodium was higher, and average intake of fiber was lower than recommended, regardless of ethnicity and geographic region. The diet of Sami vs non-Sami participants and participants from the inland vs coastal region contained significantly more iron and vitamin B12. We found a number of statistically significant ethnic differences in nutrient intake; however, many of these differences were small (3%-4%). We observed no ethnic disparities in nutritional adequacy between Sami and non-Sami populations living in rural Northern Norway. Our results suggest that, compared to the non-Sami, the Sami have a dietary intake that may reduce their risk of iron deficiency but not their cardiometabolic risk. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30802727/No_ethnic_disparities_in_nutritional_adequacy_between_the_Indigenous_Sami_and_the_non_Sami_population_living_in_rural_Northern_Norway_the_SAMINOR_2_Clinical_Survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(18)30288-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -