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Vegetarian diets and risk of hospitalisation or death with diabetes in British adults: results from the EPIC-Oxford study.
Nutr Diabetes. 2019 02 25; 9(1):7.ND

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The global prevalence of diabetes is high and rapidly increasing. Some previous studies have found that vegetarians might have a lower risk of diabetes than non-vegetarians.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the association between vegetarianism and risk of hospitalisation or death with diabetes in a large, prospective cohort study of British adults.

METHODS

The analysed cohort included participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Oxford study who were diabetes free at recruitment (1993-2001), with available dietary intake data at baseline, and linked hospital admissions and death data for diabetes over follow-up (n = 45,314). Participants were categorised as regular meat eaters (≥50 g per day: n = 15,181); low meat eaters (<50 g of meat per day: n = 7615); fish eaters (ate no meat but consumed fish: n = 7092); and vegetarians (ate no meat or fish, including vegans: n = 15,426). We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations between diet group and risk of diabetes.

RESULTS

Over a mean of 17.6 years of follow-up, 1224 incident cases of diabetes were recorded. Compared with regular meat eaters, the low meat eaters, fish eaters, and vegetarians were less likely to develop diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.75; HR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.38-0.59; and HR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.54-0.74, respectively). These associations were substantially attenuated after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) (low meat eaters: HR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.66-0.92; fish eaters: HR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.51-0.80; and vegetarians: HR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.76-1.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Low meat and non-meat eaters had a lower risk of diabetes, in part because of a lower BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, UK. Keren.Papier@ndph.ox.ac.uk.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, UK.Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30804320

Citation

Papier, Keren, et al. "Vegetarian Diets and Risk of Hospitalisation or Death With Diabetes in British Adults: Results From the EPIC-Oxford Study." Nutrition & Diabetes, vol. 9, no. 1, 2019, p. 7.
Papier K, Appleby PN, Fensom GK, et al. Vegetarian diets and risk of hospitalisation or death with diabetes in British adults: results from the EPIC-Oxford study. Nutr Diabetes. 2019;9(1):7.
Papier, K., Appleby, P. N., Fensom, G. K., Knuppel, A., Perez-Cornago, A., Schmidt, J. A., Tong, T. Y. N., & Key, T. J. (2019). Vegetarian diets and risk of hospitalisation or death with diabetes in British adults: results from the EPIC-Oxford study. Nutrition & Diabetes, 9(1), 7. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41387-019-0074-0
Papier K, et al. Vegetarian Diets and Risk of Hospitalisation or Death With Diabetes in British Adults: Results From the EPIC-Oxford Study. Nutr Diabetes. 2019 02 25;9(1):7. PubMed PMID: 30804320.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vegetarian diets and risk of hospitalisation or death with diabetes in British adults: results from the EPIC-Oxford study. AU - Papier,Keren, AU - Appleby,Paul N, AU - Fensom,Georgina K, AU - Knuppel,Anika, AU - Perez-Cornago,Aurora, AU - Schmidt,Julie A, AU - Tong,Tammy Y N, AU - Key,Timothy J, Y1 - 2019/02/25/ PY - 2018/10/22/received PY - 2019/01/31/accepted PY - 2018/11/29/revised PY - 2019/2/27/entrez PY - 2019/2/26/pubmed PY - 2020/8/28/medline SP - 7 EP - 7 JF - Nutrition & diabetes JO - Nutr Diabetes VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The global prevalence of diabetes is high and rapidly increasing. Some previous studies have found that vegetarians might have a lower risk of diabetes than non-vegetarians. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between vegetarianism and risk of hospitalisation or death with diabetes in a large, prospective cohort study of British adults. METHODS: The analysed cohort included participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Oxford study who were diabetes free at recruitment (1993-2001), with available dietary intake data at baseline, and linked hospital admissions and death data for diabetes over follow-up (n = 45,314). Participants were categorised as regular meat eaters (≥50 g per day: n = 15,181); low meat eaters (<50 g of meat per day: n = 7615); fish eaters (ate no meat but consumed fish: n = 7092); and vegetarians (ate no meat or fish, including vegans: n = 15,426). We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations between diet group and risk of diabetes. RESULTS: Over a mean of 17.6 years of follow-up, 1224 incident cases of diabetes were recorded. Compared with regular meat eaters, the low meat eaters, fish eaters, and vegetarians were less likely to develop diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.75; HR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.38-0.59; and HR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.54-0.74, respectively). These associations were substantially attenuated after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) (low meat eaters: HR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.66-0.92; fish eaters: HR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.51-0.80; and vegetarians: HR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.76-1.05). CONCLUSIONS: Low meat and non-meat eaters had a lower risk of diabetes, in part because of a lower BMI. SN - 2044-4052 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30804320/Vegetarian_diets_and_risk_of_hospitalisation_or_death_with_diabetes_in_British_adults:_results_from_the_EPIC_Oxford_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41387-019-0074-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -