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Nutrition quality of food purchases varies by household income: the SHoPPER study.
BMC Public Health. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):231.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Lower household income has been consistently associated with poorer diet quality. Household food purchases may be an important intervention target to improve diet quality among low income populations. Associations between household income and the diet quality of household food purchases were examined.

METHODS

Food purchase receipt data were collected for 14 days from 202 urban households participating in a study about food shopping. Purchase data were analyzed using NDS-R software and scored using the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI 2010). HEI total and subscores, and proportion of grocery dollars spent on food categories (e.g. fruits, vegetables, sugar sweetened beverages) were examined by household income-to-poverty ratio.

RESULTS

Compared to lower income households, after adjusting for education, marital status and race, higher income households had significantly higher HEI total scores (mean [sd] = 68.2 [13.3] versus 51.6 [13.9], respectively, adjusted p = 0.05), higher total vegetable scores (mean [sd] = 3.6 [1.4] versus 2.3 [1.6], respectively, adjusted p < .01), higher dairy scores (mean [sd] = 5.6 [3.0] versus 5.0 [3.3], p = .05) and lower proportion of grocery dollars spent on frozen desserts (1% [.02] versus 3% [.07], respectively, p = .02).

CONCLUSIONS

Lower income households purchase less healthful foods compared with higher income households. Food purchasing patterns may mediate income differences in dietary intake quality.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02073643.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 1300 South Second Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN, 55454, USA. frenc001@umn.edu.Department of Clinical Nutrition, College of Health Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, 600 Paulina Street, Room 716, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, 1700 W Van Buren Street, Suite 470, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, 1645 W. Jackson, Suite 675, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, 1700 W Van Buren Street, Suite 470, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30808311

Citation

French, Simone A., et al. "Nutrition Quality of Food Purchases Varies By Household Income: the SHoPPER Study." BMC Public Health, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019, p. 231.
French SA, Tangney CC, Crane MM, et al. Nutrition quality of food purchases varies by household income: the SHoPPER study. BMC Public Health. 2019;19(1):231.
French, S. A., Tangney, C. C., Crane, M. M., Wang, Y., & Appelhans, B. M. (2019). Nutrition quality of food purchases varies by household income: the SHoPPER study. BMC Public Health, 19(1), 231. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-6546-2
French SA, et al. Nutrition Quality of Food Purchases Varies By Household Income: the SHoPPER Study. BMC Public Health. 2019 Feb 26;19(1):231. PubMed PMID: 30808311.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrition quality of food purchases varies by household income: the SHoPPER study. AU - French,Simone A, AU - Tangney,Christy C, AU - Crane,Melissa M, AU - Wang,Yamin, AU - Appelhans,Bradley M, Y1 - 2019/02/26/ PY - 2018/03/16/received PY - 2019/02/14/accepted PY - 2019/2/28/entrez PY - 2019/2/28/pubmed PY - 2019/4/11/medline KW - Dietary intake KW - Food purchases KW - Household income KW - Nutritional quality SP - 231 EP - 231 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Lower household income has been consistently associated with poorer diet quality. Household food purchases may be an important intervention target to improve diet quality among low income populations. Associations between household income and the diet quality of household food purchases were examined. METHODS: Food purchase receipt data were collected for 14 days from 202 urban households participating in a study about food shopping. Purchase data were analyzed using NDS-R software and scored using the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI 2010). HEI total and subscores, and proportion of grocery dollars spent on food categories (e.g. fruits, vegetables, sugar sweetened beverages) were examined by household income-to-poverty ratio. RESULTS: Compared to lower income households, after adjusting for education, marital status and race, higher income households had significantly higher HEI total scores (mean [sd] = 68.2 [13.3] versus 51.6 [13.9], respectively, adjusted p = 0.05), higher total vegetable scores (mean [sd] = 3.6 [1.4] versus 2.3 [1.6], respectively, adjusted p < .01), higher dairy scores (mean [sd] = 5.6 [3.0] versus 5.0 [3.3], p = .05) and lower proportion of grocery dollars spent on frozen desserts (1% [.02] versus 3% [.07], respectively, p = .02). CONCLUSIONS: Lower income households purchase less healthful foods compared with higher income households. Food purchasing patterns may mediate income differences in dietary intake quality. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02073643. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30808311/Nutrition_quality_of_food_purchases_varies_by_household_income:_the_SHoPPER_study_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-019-6546-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -