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Supraphysiologic-dose anabolic-androgenic steroid use: A risk factor for dementia?

Abstract

Supraphysiologic-dose anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use is associated with physiologic, cognitive, and brain abnormalities similar to those found in people at risk for developing Alzheimer's Disease and its related dementias (AD/ADRD), which are associated with high brain β-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau (tau-P) protein levels. Supraphysiologic-dose AAS induces androgen abnormalities and excess oxidative stress, which have been linked to increased and decreased expression or activity of proteins that synthesize and eliminate, respectively, Aβ and tau-P. Aβ and tau-P accumulation may begin soon after initiating supraphysiologic-dose AAS use, which typically occurs in the early 20s, and their accumulation may be accelerated by other psychoactive substance use, which is common among non-medical AAS users. Accordingly, the widespread use of supraphysiologic-dose AAS may increase the numbers of people who develop dementia. Early diagnosis and correction of sex-steroid level abnormalities and excess oxidative stress could attenuate risk for developing AD/ADRD in supraphysiologic-dose AAS users, in people with other substance use disorders, and in people with low sex-steroid levels or excess oxidative stress associated with aging.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    McLean Imaging Center, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA 02478, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: kaufman@mclean.harvard.edu.

    ,

    Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA 02478, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    ,

    Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA 02478, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA 02478, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Alzheimer Disease
    Amyloid beta-Peptides
    Androgens
    Animals
    Brain
    Dementia
    Humans
    Hypogonadism
    Oxidative Stress
    Phosphorylation
    Risk Factors
    Testosterone Congeners
    tau Proteins

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    30817935

    Citation

    Kaufman, Marc J., et al. "Supraphysiologic-dose Anabolic-androgenic Steroid Use: a Risk Factor for Dementia?" Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 100, 2019, pp. 180-207.
    Kaufman MJ, Kanayama G, Hudson JI, et al. Supraphysiologic-dose anabolic-androgenic steroid use: A risk factor for dementia? Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2019;100:180-207.
    Kaufman, M. J., Kanayama, G., Hudson, J. I., & Pope, H. G. (2019). Supraphysiologic-dose anabolic-androgenic steroid use: A risk factor for dementia? Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 100, pp. 180-207. doi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2019.02.014.
    Kaufman MJ, et al. Supraphysiologic-dose Anabolic-androgenic Steroid Use: a Risk Factor for Dementia. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2019;100:180-207. PubMed PMID: 30817935.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Supraphysiologic-dose anabolic-androgenic steroid use: A risk factor for dementia? AU - Kaufman,Marc J, AU - Kanayama,Gen, AU - Hudson,James I, AU - Pope,Harrison G,Jr Y1 - 2019/02/25/ PY - 2018/12/12/received PY - 2019/02/13/revised PY - 2019/02/17/accepted PY - 2020/05/01/pmc-release PY - 2019/3/1/pubmed PY - 2019/6/27/medline PY - 2019/3/1/entrez KW - Aging KW - Alcohol KW - Alzheimer's disease KW - Amyloid KW - Anabolic-androgenic steroid KW - ApoE KW - Aquaporin 4 KW - Body-building KW - Boldenone KW - Cannabis KW - Cocaine KW - Dementia KW - Estrogen KW - GSK3β KW - Heroin KW - Homocysteine KW - Hypogonadism KW - Insomnia KW - Insulin Degrading enzyme KW - Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein1 KW - Magnetic resonance imaging KW - Magnetic resonance spectroscopy KW - Menopause KW - Methamphetamine KW - Mild Cognitive Impairment KW - Morphine KW - Muscularity KW - N-acetylcysteine KW - Nandrolone KW - Neprilysin KW - Neurodegeneration KW - Nrf2 KW - Opioid KW - Oxidative stress KW - Oxymetholone KW - PET imaging KW - Performance-enhancing drugs KW - Polydrug use KW - Prealbumin KW - Presenilin KW - Protein phosphatase 2A KW - Scyllo-inositol KW - Sex-steroid KW - Sleep disturbances KW - Stanozolol KW - Substance use disorder KW - Testosterone KW - Tobacco KW - Zinc KW - tau KW - α-secretase KW - β-secretase KW - γ-secretase SP - 180 EP - 207 JF - Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews JO - Neurosci Biobehav Rev VL - 100 N2 - Supraphysiologic-dose anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use is associated with physiologic, cognitive, and brain abnormalities similar to those found in people at risk for developing Alzheimer's Disease and its related dementias (AD/ADRD), which are associated with high brain β-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau (tau-P) protein levels. Supraphysiologic-dose AAS induces androgen abnormalities and excess oxidative stress, which have been linked to increased and decreased expression or activity of proteins that synthesize and eliminate, respectively, Aβ and tau-P. Aβ and tau-P accumulation may begin soon after initiating supraphysiologic-dose AAS use, which typically occurs in the early 20s, and their accumulation may be accelerated by other psychoactive substance use, which is common among non-medical AAS users. Accordingly, the widespread use of supraphysiologic-dose AAS may increase the numbers of people who develop dementia. Early diagnosis and correction of sex-steroid level abnormalities and excess oxidative stress could attenuate risk for developing AD/ADRD in supraphysiologic-dose AAS users, in people with other substance use disorders, and in people with low sex-steroid levels or excess oxidative stress associated with aging. SN - 1873-7528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30817935/Supraphysiologic-dose_anabolic-androgenic_steroid_use:_A_risk_factor_for_dementia L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0149-7634(18)30951-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -