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The influence of attachment representations and co-parents' scripted knowledge of attachment on fathers' and mothers' caregiving representations.
Attach Hum Dev. 2019 10; 21(5):485-509.AH

Abstract

Despite increased engagement of men in parenting, paternal caregiving representations have not been investigated, and potential gender differences in the links between parents' attachment representations and their caregiving representations are unexplored. The present study investigated fathers' and mothers' (N = 77) representations of caregiving, and links to their own and their co-parents' current mental representations of attachment. Parents were interviewed with the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and the Parental-Caregiving Attachment Interview (P-CAI), and co-parents' attachment scripts were measured with the Attachment Script Assessment (ASA). Our results demonstrate several similarities between mothers' and fathers' caregiving representations, but gender differences emerged in probable rejecting and neglecting parental behaviors. For both fathers and mothers, we found systematic differences in caregiving-specific state of mind dimensions on the P-CAI, depending on the parent's attachment classification on the AAI. Importantly, co-parent attachment security, but not parent gender was associated with the likelihood of being classified as autonomous with respect to caregiving.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Psychology, Lund University , Lund , Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30821634

Citation

Psouni, Elia. "The Influence of Attachment Representations and Co-parents' Scripted Knowledge of Attachment On Fathers' and Mothers' Caregiving Representations." Attachment & Human Development, vol. 21, no. 5, 2019, pp. 485-509.
Psouni E. The influence of attachment representations and co-parents' scripted knowledge of attachment on fathers' and mothers' caregiving representations. Attach Hum Dev. 2019;21(5):485-509.
Psouni, E. (2019). The influence of attachment representations and co-parents' scripted knowledge of attachment on fathers' and mothers' caregiving representations. Attachment & Human Development, 21(5), 485-509. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616734.2019.1582598
Psouni E. The Influence of Attachment Representations and Co-parents' Scripted Knowledge of Attachment On Fathers' and Mothers' Caregiving Representations. Attach Hum Dev. 2019;21(5):485-509. PubMed PMID: 30821634.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of attachment representations and co-parents' scripted knowledge of attachment on fathers' and mothers' caregiving representations. A1 - Psouni,Elia, Y1 - 2019/03/01/ PY - 2019/3/2/pubmed PY - 2020/6/17/medline PY - 2019/3/2/entrez KW - Fathers KW - attachment KW - co-parent influences KW - mental representations KW - parental caregiving SP - 485 EP - 509 JF - Attachment & human development JO - Attach Hum Dev VL - 21 IS - 5 N2 - Despite increased engagement of men in parenting, paternal caregiving representations have not been investigated, and potential gender differences in the links between parents' attachment representations and their caregiving representations are unexplored. The present study investigated fathers' and mothers' (N = 77) representations of caregiving, and links to their own and their co-parents' current mental representations of attachment. Parents were interviewed with the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and the Parental-Caregiving Attachment Interview (P-CAI), and co-parents' attachment scripts were measured with the Attachment Script Assessment (ASA). Our results demonstrate several similarities between mothers' and fathers' caregiving representations, but gender differences emerged in probable rejecting and neglecting parental behaviors. For both fathers and mothers, we found systematic differences in caregiving-specific state of mind dimensions on the P-CAI, depending on the parent's attachment classification on the AAI. Importantly, co-parent attachment security, but not parent gender was associated with the likelihood of being classified as autonomous with respect to caregiving. SN - 1469-2988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30821634/The_influence_of_attachment_representations_and_co_parents'_scripted_knowledge_of_attachment_on_fathers'_and_mothers'_caregiving_representations_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14616734.2019.1582598 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -