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Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate as a Chemical Indicator for Phthalic Acid Esters: An Investigation into Phthalic Acid Esters in Cultivated Fields and E-Waste Dismantling Sites.
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019 05; 38(5):1132-1141.ET

Abstract

Phthalic acid esters (PAEs) represent an ongoing pollution problem and have attracted extensive attention due to their ubiquitous presence in the environment. We investigated the distribution of 6 PAEs (benzyl butyl phthalate [BBP], dibutyl phthalate [DBP], di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate [DEHP], diethyl phthalate [DEP], dimethyl phthalate [DMP], and di-n-octyl phthalate [DnOP]) in cultivated soils, including vegetable fields and paddy fields, as well as the soils of E-waste dismantling sites. We also explored the relationship between the particle size of soils and the distribution of PAEs, put forward a novel method to forecast the occurrence and fate of PAEs in soils with DEHP used as a chemical indicator, and made a preliminary assessment of the potential ecological risks of the 6 target compounds in soils. The results showed that the detection rate of target PAEs was 100%, and that the concentrations of ∑6 PAEs ranged from 1.2 to 7.3 mg/kg in vegetable fields, 1.2 to 1.5 mg/kg in paddy fields, and 11.8 to 17.9 mg/kg in E-waste dismantling sites. In addition, DEHP exhibited the maximum concentrations (0.480-15.34 mg/kg) in all soil samples. The results also showed that in the wake of decreasing particle size, increasing soil organic carbon would enhance the sorption of PAEs in soils. Moreover, the correlation formula of DEHP successfully predicted the concentrations of other PAEs and ∑ 6 PAEs in soils, suggesting that DEHP could be a dependable chemical indicator for forecasting the environmental occurrence of PAEs in soils. Based on the residual levels in the trial sites and limited toxicity data, high risks to soil organisms are expected for DBP, DEP, and DEHP, and low-medium risks for BBP, DnOP, and DMP. Environ Toxicol Chem 2019;00:1-11. © 2019 SETAC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Industrial Contaminated Site Remediation Technology and Equipment, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Industrial Contaminated Site Remediation Technology and Equipment, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Industrial Contaminated Site Remediation Technology and Equipment, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Industrial Contaminated Site Remediation Technology and Equipment, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Industrial Contaminated Site Remediation Technology and Equipment, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Industrial Contaminated Site Remediation Technology and Equipment, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong Engineering Research Center of Industrial Contaminated Site Remediation Technology and Equipment, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30821838

Citation

Liu, Shuangshuang, et al. "Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate as a Chemical Indicator for Phthalic Acid Esters: an Investigation Into Phthalic Acid Esters in Cultivated Fields and E-Waste Dismantling Sites." Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, vol. 38, no. 5, 2019, pp. 1132-1141.
Liu S, Peng Y, Lin Q, et al. Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate as a Chemical Indicator for Phthalic Acid Esters: An Investigation into Phthalic Acid Esters in Cultivated Fields and E-Waste Dismantling Sites. Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019;38(5):1132-1141.
Liu, S., Peng, Y., Lin, Q., Xiao, R., Luo, H., Liao, X., Yin, G., & Liu, Q. (2019). Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate as a Chemical Indicator for Phthalic Acid Esters: An Investigation into Phthalic Acid Esters in Cultivated Fields and E-Waste Dismantling Sites. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 38(5), 1132-1141. https://doi.org/10.1002/etc.4402
Liu S, et al. Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate as a Chemical Indicator for Phthalic Acid Esters: an Investigation Into Phthalic Acid Esters in Cultivated Fields and E-Waste Dismantling Sites. Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019;38(5):1132-1141. PubMed PMID: 30821838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate as a Chemical Indicator for Phthalic Acid Esters: An Investigation into Phthalic Acid Esters in Cultivated Fields and E-Waste Dismantling Sites. AU - Liu,Shuangshuang, AU - Peng,Yuanfeng, AU - Lin,Qintie, AU - Xiao,Rongbo, AU - Luo,Haoyu, AU - Liao,Xiaoyong, AU - Yin,Guangcai, AU - Liu,Qianjun, Y1 - 2019/04/17/ PY - 2018/09/06/received PY - 2019/02/15/revised PY - 2019/02/19/accepted PY - 2019/3/2/pubmed PY - 2020/4/18/medline PY - 2019/3/2/entrez KW - Chemical indicator KW - Particle size KW - Phthalic acid esters KW - Risk KW - Soils KW - Source analysis SP - 1132 EP - 1141 JF - Environmental toxicology and chemistry JO - Environ Toxicol Chem VL - 38 IS - 5 N2 - Phthalic acid esters (PAEs) represent an ongoing pollution problem and have attracted extensive attention due to their ubiquitous presence in the environment. We investigated the distribution of 6 PAEs (benzyl butyl phthalate [BBP], dibutyl phthalate [DBP], di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate [DEHP], diethyl phthalate [DEP], dimethyl phthalate [DMP], and di-n-octyl phthalate [DnOP]) in cultivated soils, including vegetable fields and paddy fields, as well as the soils of E-waste dismantling sites. We also explored the relationship between the particle size of soils and the distribution of PAEs, put forward a novel method to forecast the occurrence and fate of PAEs in soils with DEHP used as a chemical indicator, and made a preliminary assessment of the potential ecological risks of the 6 target compounds in soils. The results showed that the detection rate of target PAEs was 100%, and that the concentrations of ∑6 PAEs ranged from 1.2 to 7.3 mg/kg in vegetable fields, 1.2 to 1.5 mg/kg in paddy fields, and 11.8 to 17.9 mg/kg in E-waste dismantling sites. In addition, DEHP exhibited the maximum concentrations (0.480-15.34 mg/kg) in all soil samples. The results also showed that in the wake of decreasing particle size, increasing soil organic carbon would enhance the sorption of PAEs in soils. Moreover, the correlation formula of DEHP successfully predicted the concentrations of other PAEs and ∑ 6 PAEs in soils, suggesting that DEHP could be a dependable chemical indicator for forecasting the environmental occurrence of PAEs in soils. Based on the residual levels in the trial sites and limited toxicity data, high risks to soil organisms are expected for DBP, DEP, and DEHP, and low-medium risks for BBP, DnOP, and DMP. Environ Toxicol Chem 2019;00:1-11. © 2019 SETAC. SN - 1552-8618 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30821838/Di__2_Ethylhexyl__Phthalate_as_a_Chemical_Indicator_for_Phthalic_Acid_Esters:_An_Investigation_into_Phthalic_Acid_Esters_in_Cultivated_Fields_and_E_Waste_Dismantling_Sites_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/etc.4402 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -