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Symptoms in cervical vertigo.

Abstract

Objective

To use a unique, 41-question survey to identify patient features distinguishing cervical vertigo from vestibular causes of vertigo and vestibular migraine.

Methods

In this study, a unique, 41-question survey was administered to 48 patients diagnosed with cervical vertigo (n = 16), migraine (n = 16), and vestibular vertigo (eg, unilateral vestibular paresis, Meniere's disease) (n = 16) to test the hypothesis that a set of distinct symptoms can characterize cervical vertigo. Responses between the three diagnostic groups were compared to identify questions which differentiated patients based on their symptoms.

Results

Eight questions were successful in differentiating vestibular vertigo from migraine and cervical vertigo. Symptoms endorsed by subjects with cervical vertigo overlapped substantially with subjects with well-established vestibular disturbances as well as symptoms of subjects with migraine. Twenty-seven percent of cervical vertigo subjects reported having true vertigo, 50% having headache, and 94% having neck pain.

Conclusion

Lacking knowledge of neck disturbance, the symptoms we elicited in our questionnaire suggest that cervical vertigo subjects may resemble migraine subjects who also have evidence of neck injury. Whether or not subjects with "cervical vertigo" also overlap with other diagnoses defined by a combination of symptoms and exclusion of objective findings such as chronic subjective dizziness and other variants of psychogenic dizziness remain to be established.

Level of Evidence

IV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee Wisconsin. Chicago Dizziness and Hearing Chicago Illinois.Chicago Dizziness and Hearing Chicago Illinois. The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Chicago Illinois.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30828627

Citation

Thompson-Harvey, Adam, and Timothy C. Hain. "Symptoms in Cervical Vertigo." Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology, vol. 4, no. 1, 2019, pp. 109-115.
Thompson-Harvey A, Hain TC. Symptoms in cervical vertigo. Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol. 2019;4(1):109-115.
Thompson-Harvey, A., & Hain, T. C. (2019). Symptoms in cervical vertigo. Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology, 4(1), pp. 109-115. doi:10.1002/lio2.227.
Thompson-Harvey A, Hain TC. Symptoms in Cervical Vertigo. Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol. 2019;4(1):109-115. PubMed PMID: 30828627.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Symptoms in cervical vertigo. AU - Thompson-Harvey,Adam, AU - Hain,Timothy C, Y1 - 2018/11/28/ PY - 2018/04/20/received PY - 2018/09/24/revised PY - 2018/10/11/accepted PY - 2019/3/5/entrez PY - 2019/3/5/pubmed PY - 2019/3/5/medline KW - Cervical Vertigo KW - cervicogenic dizziness KW - migraine KW - neck injury KW - symptoms KW - vertigo SP - 109 EP - 115 JF - Laryngoscope investigative otolaryngology JO - Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - Objective: To use a unique, 41-question survey to identify patient features distinguishing cervical vertigo from vestibular causes of vertigo and vestibular migraine. Methods: In this study, a unique, 41-question survey was administered to 48 patients diagnosed with cervical vertigo (n = 16), migraine (n = 16), and vestibular vertigo (eg, unilateral vestibular paresis, Meniere's disease) (n = 16) to test the hypothesis that a set of distinct symptoms can characterize cervical vertigo. Responses between the three diagnostic groups were compared to identify questions which differentiated patients based on their symptoms. Results: Eight questions were successful in differentiating vestibular vertigo from migraine and cervical vertigo. Symptoms endorsed by subjects with cervical vertigo overlapped substantially with subjects with well-established vestibular disturbances as well as symptoms of subjects with migraine. Twenty-seven percent of cervical vertigo subjects reported having true vertigo, 50% having headache, and 94% having neck pain. Conclusion: Lacking knowledge of neck disturbance, the symptoms we elicited in our questionnaire suggest that cervical vertigo subjects may resemble migraine subjects who also have evidence of neck injury. Whether or not subjects with "cervical vertigo" also overlap with other diagnoses defined by a combination of symptoms and exclusion of objective findings such as chronic subjective dizziness and other variants of psychogenic dizziness remain to be established. Level of Evidence: IV. SN - 2378-8038 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30828627/Symptoms_in_cervical_vertigo_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30828627/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -