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Comparison of high flow nasal cannula oxygen administration to traditional nasal cannula oxygen therapy in healthy dogs.
J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio). 2019 May; 29(3):246-255.JV

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the feasibility, degree of respiratory support, and safety of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy in sedated and awake healthy dogs, when compared to traditional nasal cannula (TNC) oxygen administration.

DESIGN

Randomized experimental crossover study.

SETTING

University research facility.

ANIMALS

Eight healthy dogs.

INTERVENTIONS

Variable flow rates (L/kg/min) were assessed, TNC: 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 and HFNC: 0.4, 1.0, 2.0, and 2.5. HFNC was assessed in sedated and awake dogs.

MEASUREMENTS

Variables measured included: inspiratory/expiratory airway pressures, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), end-tidal oxygen (ETO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), temperature, heart/respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, and pulse oximetry. Sedation status, complications, and predefined tolerance and respiratory scores were recorded.

MAIN RESULTS

Using HFNC, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was achieved at 1 and 2 L/kg/min. CPAP was not higher at 2.5 than 2 L/kg/min, with worse tolerance scores. Expiratory airway pressures were increased when sedated (P = 0.006). FiO2 at 0.4 L/kg/min for both methods was 72%. FiO2 with TNC 0.1 L/kg/min was 27% and not different from room air. The FiO2 at all HFNC flow rates ≥1 L/kg/min was 95%. PaO2 for HFNC 0.4 L/kg/min was lower than at other flow rates (P = 0.005). The only noted complication was aerophagia. PaCO2 was increased with sedation and use of HFNC when compared to baseline (P = 0.006; P < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Use of HFNC in dogs is feasible and safe, provides predictable oxygen support and provides CPAP, but may cause a mild increase in PaCO2 . Flow rates of 1-2 L/kg/min are recommended. If using TNC, flow rates above 0.1 L/kg/min may attain higher FiO2 .

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.Department of Clinical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.Department of Clinical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.Department of Clinical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial, Veterinary
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30861261

Citation

Jagodich, Tiffany A., et al. "Comparison of High Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Administration to Traditional Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy in Healthy Dogs." Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001), vol. 29, no. 3, 2019, pp. 246-255.
Jagodich TA, Bersenas AME, Bateman SW, et al. Comparison of high flow nasal cannula oxygen administration to traditional nasal cannula oxygen therapy in healthy dogs. J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio). 2019;29(3):246-255.
Jagodich, T. A., Bersenas, A. M. E., Bateman, S. W., & Kerr, C. L. (2019). Comparison of high flow nasal cannula oxygen administration to traditional nasal cannula oxygen therapy in healthy dogs. Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001), 29(3), 246-255. https://doi.org/10.1111/vec.12817
Jagodich TA, et al. Comparison of High Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Administration to Traditional Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy in Healthy Dogs. J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio). 2019;29(3):246-255. PubMed PMID: 30861261.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of high flow nasal cannula oxygen administration to traditional nasal cannula oxygen therapy in healthy dogs. AU - Jagodich,Tiffany A, AU - Bersenas,Alexa M E, AU - Bateman,Shane W, AU - Kerr,Carolyn L, Y1 - 2019/03/12/ PY - 2017/01/29/received PY - 2017/03/20/revised PY - 2017/04/23/accepted PY - 2019/3/13/pubmed PY - 2019/7/16/medline PY - 2019/3/13/entrez KW - Optiflow KW - high flow nasal cannula KW - high flow nasal oxygen KW - noninvasive ventilation KW - oxygen supplementation SP - 246 EP - 255 JF - Journal of veterinary emergency and critical care (San Antonio, Tex. : 2001) JO - J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility, degree of respiratory support, and safety of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy in sedated and awake healthy dogs, when compared to traditional nasal cannula (TNC) oxygen administration. DESIGN: Randomized experimental crossover study. SETTING: University research facility. ANIMALS: Eight healthy dogs. INTERVENTIONS: Variable flow rates (L/kg/min) were assessed, TNC: 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 and HFNC: 0.4, 1.0, 2.0, and 2.5. HFNC was assessed in sedated and awake dogs. MEASUREMENTS: Variables measured included: inspiratory/expiratory airway pressures, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), end-tidal oxygen (ETO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), temperature, heart/respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, and pulse oximetry. Sedation status, complications, and predefined tolerance and respiratory scores were recorded. MAIN RESULTS: Using HFNC, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was achieved at 1 and 2 L/kg/min. CPAP was not higher at 2.5 than 2 L/kg/min, with worse tolerance scores. Expiratory airway pressures were increased when sedated (P = 0.006). FiO2 at 0.4 L/kg/min for both methods was 72%. FiO2 with TNC 0.1 L/kg/min was 27% and not different from room air. The FiO2 at all HFNC flow rates ≥1 L/kg/min was 95%. PaO2 for HFNC 0.4 L/kg/min was lower than at other flow rates (P = 0.005). The only noted complication was aerophagia. PaCO2 was increased with sedation and use of HFNC when compared to baseline (P = 0.006; P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Use of HFNC in dogs is feasible and safe, provides predictable oxygen support and provides CPAP, but may cause a mild increase in PaCO2 . Flow rates of 1-2 L/kg/min are recommended. If using TNC, flow rates above 0.1 L/kg/min may attain higher FiO2 . SN - 1476-4431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30861261/Comparison_of_high_flow_nasal_cannula_oxygen_administration_to_traditional_nasal_cannula_oxygen_therapy_in_healthy_dogs_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/vec.12817 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -