Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Reward and emotion influence attentional bias in rapid serial visual presentation.
Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2019 Sep; 72(9):2155-2167.QJ

Abstract

Facial emotion constitutes an important source of information, and rapid processing of this information may bring adaptive advantages. Previous evidence suggests that emotional faces are sometimes prioritised for cognitive processing. Three experiments used an emotion-induced blindness task to examine whether this prioritisation occurs in a purely stimulus-driven fashion or whether it emerges only when the faces are task-relevant. Angry or neutral faces appeared as distractors in a rapid serial visual presentation sequence, shortly before a target that participants were required to identify. Either the emotion (Experiment 1) or gender (Experiments 2 and 3) of the distractor face indicated whether a correct/incorrect response to the target would produce reward/punishment, or not. The three experiments found that reward-related faces impaired subsequent target identification, replicating previous results. Target identification accuracy was also impaired following angry faces, compared with neutral faces, demonstrating an emotion-induced attentional bias. Importantly, this impairment was observed even when face emotion was entirely irrelevant to the participants' ongoing task (in Experiments 2 and 3), suggesting that rapid processing of the facial emotion might arise (at least in part) from the operation of relatively automatic cognitive-perceptual processes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Basic Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain. 2 School of Psychology, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.1 Department of Basic Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain. 2 School of Psychology, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. 3 Department of Basic Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.2 School of Psychology, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.1 Department of Basic Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.2 School of Psychology, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30862249

Citation

Gutiérrez-Cobo, María J., et al. "Reward and Emotion Influence Attentional Bias in Rapid Serial Visual Presentation." Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2006), vol. 72, no. 9, 2019, pp. 2155-2167.
Gutiérrez-Cobo MJ, Luque D, Most SB, et al. Reward and emotion influence attentional bias in rapid serial visual presentation. Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2019;72(9):2155-2167.
Gutiérrez-Cobo, M. J., Luque, D., Most, S. B., Fernández-Berrocal, P., & Le Pelley, M. E. (2019). Reward and emotion influence attentional bias in rapid serial visual presentation. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2006), 72(9), 2155-2167. https://doi.org/10.1177/1747021819840615
Gutiérrez-Cobo MJ, et al. Reward and Emotion Influence Attentional Bias in Rapid Serial Visual Presentation. Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2019;72(9):2155-2167. PubMed PMID: 30862249.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reward and emotion influence attentional bias in rapid serial visual presentation. AU - Gutiérrez-Cobo,María J, AU - Luque,David, AU - Most,Steven B, AU - Fernández-Berrocal,Pablo, AU - Le Pelley,Mike E, Y1 - 2019/04/08/ PY - 2019/3/14/pubmed PY - 2020/2/12/medline PY - 2019/3/14/entrez KW - Emotion-induced blindness KW - attentional blink KW - emotion KW - faces KW - reward SP - 2155 EP - 2167 JF - Quarterly journal of experimental psychology (2006) JO - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) VL - 72 IS - 9 N2 - Facial emotion constitutes an important source of information, and rapid processing of this information may bring adaptive advantages. Previous evidence suggests that emotional faces are sometimes prioritised for cognitive processing. Three experiments used an emotion-induced blindness task to examine whether this prioritisation occurs in a purely stimulus-driven fashion or whether it emerges only when the faces are task-relevant. Angry or neutral faces appeared as distractors in a rapid serial visual presentation sequence, shortly before a target that participants were required to identify. Either the emotion (Experiment 1) or gender (Experiments 2 and 3) of the distractor face indicated whether a correct/incorrect response to the target would produce reward/punishment, or not. The three experiments found that reward-related faces impaired subsequent target identification, replicating previous results. Target identification accuracy was also impaired following angry faces, compared with neutral faces, demonstrating an emotion-induced attentional bias. Importantly, this impairment was observed even when face emotion was entirely irrelevant to the participants' ongoing task (in Experiments 2 and 3), suggesting that rapid processing of the facial emotion might arise (at least in part) from the operation of relatively automatic cognitive-perceptual processes. SN - 1747-0226 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30862249/Reward_and_emotion_influence_attentional_bias_in_rapid_serial_visual_presentation_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1747021819840615?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -