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Long-term computed tomography follow-up in great Danes with or without signs of osseous- associated cervical Spondylomyelopathy.
BMC Vet Res. 2019 Mar 12; 15(1):90.BV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Osseous- associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (OA-CSM) has a high prevalence in Great Danes. In order to understand the progression of osseous changes, we aimed to perform a long-term computed tomographic (CT) follow-up study of Great Dane dogs with and without OA-CSM. Canine CSM is comparable to a common neurologic disease often diagnosed in older people termed cervical spondylotic myelopathy or degenerative cervical myelopathy, which is progressive in nature. The natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy in people has been well described, whereas there is scarce information on the natural history of canine OA-CSM. Our first goal was to evaluate if follow-up CT studies showed any changes compared to initial CT studies in Great Dane dogs with a diagnosis of OA-CSM. Our second goal was to establish whether clinically normal Great Danes went on to develop any vertebral changes or clinical signs consistent with OA-CSM. We enrolled Great Danes diagnosed with OA-CSM and clinically normal Great Danes who had previously participated in a prospective study. All dogs had clinical and CT follow-up evaluations.

RESULTS

Twelve Great Dane dogs were investigated: six OA-CSM affected and six clinically normal dogs. The median time between CT studies was 28 months (OA-CSM dogs) and 25 months (normal dogs). On follow-up CT, two OA-CSM-affected dogs developed new sites of stenosis, and two clinically normal dogs developed new sites of stenosis (one each). Disc spaces most commonly affected were C4-C5, C5-C6 and C6-C7. New sites of foraminal stenosis were noted in two of the CSM-affected and four of the clinically normal dogs. Morphometric evaluation showed no statistically significant differences between the initial and follow-up CT studies in the OA-CSM affected or normal groups.

CONCLUSION

Our long-term CT follow-up study documented progression of vertebral canal stenosis in four out of twelve dogs. The majority of dogs did not develop new sites of stenosis or show progression of vertebral lesions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH, USA.Freelance medical and veterinary writer, Madrid, Spain.College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH, USA.College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH, USA.College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp St, Columbus, OH, USA. dacosta.6@osu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30866937

Citation

Vansteenkiste, Daniella, et al. "Long-term Computed Tomography Follow-up in Great Danes With or Without Signs of Osseous- Associated Cervical Spondylomyelopathy." BMC Veterinary Research, vol. 15, no. 1, 2019, p. 90.
Vansteenkiste D, Martin-Vaquero P, Bonelli M, et al. Long-term computed tomography follow-up in great Danes with or without signs of osseous- associated cervical Spondylomyelopathy. BMC Vet Res. 2019;15(1):90.
Vansteenkiste, D., Martin-Vaquero, P., Bonelli, M., da Costa, L. B., & da Costa, R. C. (2019). Long-term computed tomography follow-up in great Danes with or without signs of osseous- associated cervical Spondylomyelopathy. BMC Veterinary Research, 15(1), 90. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12917-019-1835-7
Vansteenkiste D, et al. Long-term Computed Tomography Follow-up in Great Danes With or Without Signs of Osseous- Associated Cervical Spondylomyelopathy. BMC Vet Res. 2019 Mar 12;15(1):90. PubMed PMID: 30866937.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term computed tomography follow-up in great Danes with or without signs of osseous- associated cervical Spondylomyelopathy. AU - Vansteenkiste,Daniella, AU - Martin-Vaquero,Paula, AU - Bonelli,Marília, AU - da Costa,Luciana B, AU - da Costa,Ronaldo C, Y1 - 2019/03/12/ PY - 2018/10/12/received PY - 2019/03/04/accepted PY - 2019/3/15/entrez PY - 2019/3/15/pubmed PY - 2019/4/2/medline KW - Articular facet regularity and proliferation KW - Morphologic assessment KW - Morphometry KW - Natural history KW - Osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy KW - Vertebral canal area SP - 90 EP - 90 JF - BMC veterinary research JO - BMC Vet Res VL - 15 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Osseous- associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (OA-CSM) has a high prevalence in Great Danes. In order to understand the progression of osseous changes, we aimed to perform a long-term computed tomographic (CT) follow-up study of Great Dane dogs with and without OA-CSM. Canine CSM is comparable to a common neurologic disease often diagnosed in older people termed cervical spondylotic myelopathy or degenerative cervical myelopathy, which is progressive in nature. The natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy in people has been well described, whereas there is scarce information on the natural history of canine OA-CSM. Our first goal was to evaluate if follow-up CT studies showed any changes compared to initial CT studies in Great Dane dogs with a diagnosis of OA-CSM. Our second goal was to establish whether clinically normal Great Danes went on to develop any vertebral changes or clinical signs consistent with OA-CSM. We enrolled Great Danes diagnosed with OA-CSM and clinically normal Great Danes who had previously participated in a prospective study. All dogs had clinical and CT follow-up evaluations. RESULTS: Twelve Great Dane dogs were investigated: six OA-CSM affected and six clinically normal dogs. The median time between CT studies was 28 months (OA-CSM dogs) and 25 months (normal dogs). On follow-up CT, two OA-CSM-affected dogs developed new sites of stenosis, and two clinically normal dogs developed new sites of stenosis (one each). Disc spaces most commonly affected were C4-C5, C5-C6 and C6-C7. New sites of foraminal stenosis were noted in two of the CSM-affected and four of the clinically normal dogs. Morphometric evaluation showed no statistically significant differences between the initial and follow-up CT studies in the OA-CSM affected or normal groups. CONCLUSION: Our long-term CT follow-up study documented progression of vertebral canal stenosis in four out of twelve dogs. The majority of dogs did not develop new sites of stenosis or show progression of vertebral lesions. SN - 1746-6148 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30866937/Long_term_computed_tomography_follow_up_in_great_Danes_with_or_without_signs_of_osseous__associated_cervical_Spondylomyelopathy_ L2 - https://bmcvetres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12917-019-1835-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -