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Exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories promotes prejudice which spreads across groups.

Abstract

This research experimentally examined the effects of exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories on prejudice and discrimination. Study 1 (N = 166) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories concerning immigrants to Britain from the European Union (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) exacerbated prejudice towards this group. Study 2 (N = 173) found the same effect in a different intergroup context - exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) increased prejudice towards this group and reduced participants' willingness to vote for a Jewish political candidate. Finally, Study 3 (N = 114) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people not only increased prejudice towards this group but was indirectly associated with increased prejudice towards a number of secondary outgroups (e.g., Asians, Arabs, Americans, Irish, Australians). The current research suggests that conspiracy theories may have potentially damaging and widespread consequences for intergroup relations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Staffordshire University, Stoke-on-Trent, UK.University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.University of Kent, Canterbury, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30868563

Citation

Jolley, Daniel, et al. "Exposure to Intergroup Conspiracy Theories Promotes Prejudice Which Spreads Across Groups." British Journal of Psychology (London, England : 1953), 2019.
Jolley D, Meleady R, Douglas KM. Exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories promotes prejudice which spreads across groups. Br J Psychol. 2019.
Jolley, D., Meleady, R., & Douglas, K. M. (2019). Exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories promotes prejudice which spreads across groups. British Journal of Psychology (London, England : 1953), doi:10.1111/bjop.12385.
Jolley D, Meleady R, Douglas KM. Exposure to Intergroup Conspiracy Theories Promotes Prejudice Which Spreads Across Groups. Br J Psychol. 2019 Mar 13; PubMed PMID: 30868563.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories promotes prejudice which spreads across groups. AU - Jolley,Daniel, AU - Meleady,Rose, AU - Douglas,Karen M, Y1 - 2019/03/13/ PY - 2018/08/17/received PY - 2019/01/11/revised PY - 2019/3/15/entrez KW - conspiracy theories KW - discrimination KW - intergroup relations KW - prejudice JF - British journal of psychology (London, England : 1953) JO - Br J Psychol N2 - This research experimentally examined the effects of exposure to intergroup conspiracy theories on prejudice and discrimination. Study 1 (N = 166) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories concerning immigrants to Britain from the European Union (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) exacerbated prejudice towards this group. Study 2 (N = 173) found the same effect in a different intergroup context - exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people (vs. anti-conspiracy material or a control) increased prejudice towards this group and reduced participants' willingness to vote for a Jewish political candidate. Finally, Study 3 (N = 114) demonstrated that exposure to conspiracy theories about Jewish people not only increased prejudice towards this group but was indirectly associated with increased prejudice towards a number of secondary outgroups (e.g., Asians, Arabs, Americans, Irish, Australians). The current research suggests that conspiracy theories may have potentially damaging and widespread consequences for intergroup relations. SN - 2044-8295 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30868563/Exposure_to_intergroup_conspiracy_theories_promotes_prejudice_which_spreads_across_groups_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12385 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -