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Paternal stimulation and father-infant attachment.
Attach Hum Dev. 2020 02; 22(1):15-26.AH

Abstract

This study examined the longitudinal associations between fathers' observed parenting behaviors and father-infant attachment (n = 58 father-infant dyads). Fathers were observed playing with their infants at 9 months postpartum and were assessed for stimulating behaviors (i.e. physical and/or object stimulation), as well as their sensitivity and intrusiveness. When the infants were 12 to 18 months of age, fathers and infants participated together in the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) to assess father-infant attachment security. Logistic regression analyses revealed that higher levels of paternal stimulation at 9 months postpartum were associated with greater odds of classification as a secure father-infant dyad. Additionally, fathers' observed intrusiveness at 9 months postpartum moderated this association; greater paternal stimulation was associated with significantly greater odds of father-infant attachment security at low and average levels of paternal intrusiveness, but not at high levels of paternal intrusiveness. This study provides new insight into the paternal behaviors that may foster secure father-infant attachment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.Department of Human Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.Department of Psychology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.Department of Human Development and Family Science, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA.Department of Human Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30873899

Citation

Olsavsky, Anna L., et al. "Paternal Stimulation and Father-infant Attachment." Attachment & Human Development, vol. 22, no. 1, 2020, pp. 15-26.
Olsavsky AL, Berrigan MN, Schoppe-Sullivan SJ, et al. Paternal stimulation and father-infant attachment. Attach Hum Dev. 2020;22(1):15-26.
Olsavsky, A. L., Berrigan, M. N., Schoppe-Sullivan, S. J., Brown, G. L., & Kamp Dush, C. M. (2020). Paternal stimulation and father-infant attachment. Attachment & Human Development, 22(1), 15-26. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616734.2019.1589057
Olsavsky AL, et al. Paternal Stimulation and Father-infant Attachment. Attach Hum Dev. 2020;22(1):15-26. PubMed PMID: 30873899.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Paternal stimulation and father-infant attachment. AU - Olsavsky,Anna L, AU - Berrigan,Miranda N, AU - Schoppe-Sullivan,Sarah J, AU - Brown,Geoffrey L, AU - Kamp Dush,Claire M, Y1 - 2019/03/15/ PY - 2021/02/01/pmc-release PY - 2019/3/16/pubmed PY - 2020/11/26/medline PY - 2019/3/16/entrez KW - Father-infant attachment KW - father-child play KW - intrusiveness KW - sensitivity KW - stimulation SP - 15 EP - 26 JF - Attachment & human development JO - Attach Hum Dev VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - This study examined the longitudinal associations between fathers' observed parenting behaviors and father-infant attachment (n = 58 father-infant dyads). Fathers were observed playing with their infants at 9 months postpartum and were assessed for stimulating behaviors (i.e. physical and/or object stimulation), as well as their sensitivity and intrusiveness. When the infants were 12 to 18 months of age, fathers and infants participated together in the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) to assess father-infant attachment security. Logistic regression analyses revealed that higher levels of paternal stimulation at 9 months postpartum were associated with greater odds of classification as a secure father-infant dyad. Additionally, fathers' observed intrusiveness at 9 months postpartum moderated this association; greater paternal stimulation was associated with significantly greater odds of father-infant attachment security at low and average levels of paternal intrusiveness, but not at high levels of paternal intrusiveness. This study provides new insight into the paternal behaviors that may foster secure father-infant attachment. SN - 1469-2988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30873899/Paternal_stimulation_and_father_infant_attachment_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14616734.2019.1589057 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -