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Reduced dynamics of functional connectivity and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.
Mult Scler 2019; :1352458519837707MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In multiple sclerosis (MS), abnormalities of brain network dynamics and their relevance for cognitive impairment have never been investigated.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to assess the dynamic resting state (RS) functional connectivity (FC) on 62 relapsing-remitting MS patients and 65 sex-matched healthy controls enrolled at 7 European sites.

METHODS:

MS patients underwent clinical and cognitive evaluation. Between-group network FC differences were evaluated using a dynamic approach (based on sliding-window correlation analysis) and grouping correlation matrices into recurrent FC states.

RESULTS:

Dynamic FC analysis revealed, in healthy controls and MS patients, three recurrent FC states: two characterized by strong intra- and inter-network connectivity and one characterized by weak inter-network connectivity (State 3). A total of 23 MS patients were cognitively impaired (CI). Compared to cognitively preserved (CP), CI-MS patients had reduced RS-FC between subcortical and default-mode networks in the low-connectivity State 3 and lower dwell time (i.e. time spent in a given state) in the high-connectivity State 2. CI-MS patients also exhibited a lower number and a less frequent switching between meta-states, as well as a smaller distance traveled through connectivity states.

CONCLUSION:

Time-varying RS-FC was markedly less dynamic in CI- versus CP-MS patients, suggesting that slow inter-network connectivity contributes to cognitive dysfunction in MS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.I Division of Neurology, Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, University of Campania "L. Vanvitelli," Naples, Italy.Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.Department of Radiology & Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands/Queen Square MS Centre, Department of Neuroinflammation, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London (UCL), London, UK.Queen Square MS Centre, Department of Neuroinflammation, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London (UCL), London, UK.Department of Neurology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.I Division of Neurology, Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, University of Campania "L. Vanvitelli," Naples, Italy.Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.Department of Neurology/Neuroimmunology, Multiple Sclerosis Centre of Catalonia (Cemcat), Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.Department of Anatomy & Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Queen Square MS Centre, Department of Neuroinflammation, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London (UCL), London, UK.Department of Neurology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy/Department of Neurology, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy/Department of Neurology, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30887862

Citation

d'Ambrosio, Alessandro, et al. "Reduced Dynamics of Functional Connectivity and Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis." Multiple Sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England), 2019, p. 1352458519837707.
d'Ambrosio A, Valsasina P, Gallo A, et al. Reduced dynamics of functional connectivity and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler. 2019.
d'Ambrosio, A., Valsasina, P., Gallo, A., De Stefano, N., Pareto, D., Barkhof, F., ... Rocca, M. A. (2019). Reduced dynamics of functional connectivity and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England), p. 1352458519837707. doi:10.1177/1352458519837707.
d'Ambrosio A, et al. Reduced Dynamics of Functional Connectivity and Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis. Mult Scler. 2019 Mar 19;1352458519837707. PubMed PMID: 30887862.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reduced dynamics of functional connectivity and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. AU - d'Ambrosio,Alessandro, AU - Valsasina,Paola, AU - Gallo,Antonio, AU - De Stefano,Nicola, AU - Pareto,Deborah, AU - Barkhof,Frederik, AU - Ciccarelli,Olga, AU - Enzinger,Christian, AU - Tedeschi,Gioacchino, AU - Stromillo,M Laura, AU - Arévalo,Maria J, AU - Hulst,Hanneke E, AU - Muhlert,Nils, AU - Koini,Marisa, AU - Filippi,Massimo, AU - Rocca,Maria A, Y1 - 2019/03/19/ PY - 2019/3/20/entrez KW - Cognitive impairment KW - brain dynamics KW - functional connectivity KW - functional magnetic resonance imaging KW - multiple sclerosis KW - resting state SP - 1352458519837707 EP - 1352458519837707 JF - Multiple sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England) JO - Mult. Scler. N2 - BACKGROUND:: In multiple sclerosis (MS), abnormalities of brain network dynamics and their relevance for cognitive impairment have never been investigated. OBJECTIVES:: The aim of this study was to assess the dynamic resting state (RS) functional connectivity (FC) on 62 relapsing-remitting MS patients and 65 sex-matched healthy controls enrolled at 7 European sites. METHODS:: MS patients underwent clinical and cognitive evaluation. Between-group network FC differences were evaluated using a dynamic approach (based on sliding-window correlation analysis) and grouping correlation matrices into recurrent FC states. RESULTS:: Dynamic FC analysis revealed, in healthy controls and MS patients, three recurrent FC states: two characterized by strong intra- and inter-network connectivity and one characterized by weak inter-network connectivity (State 3). A total of 23 MS patients were cognitively impaired (CI). Compared to cognitively preserved (CP), CI-MS patients had reduced RS-FC between subcortical and default-mode networks in the low-connectivity State 3 and lower dwell time (i.e. time spent in a given state) in the high-connectivity State 2. CI-MS patients also exhibited a lower number and a less frequent switching between meta-states, as well as a smaller distance traveled through connectivity states. CONCLUSION:: Time-varying RS-FC was markedly less dynamic in CI- versus CP-MS patients, suggesting that slow inter-network connectivity contributes to cognitive dysfunction in MS. SN - 1477-0970 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30887862/Reduced_dynamics_of_functional_connectivity_and_cognitive_impairment_in_multiple_sclerosis_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1352458519837707?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -