Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Understanding gloss perception through the lens of art: Combining perception, image analysis, and painting recipes of 17th century painted grapes.
J Vis. 2019 03 01; 19(3):7.JV

Abstract

To understand the key image features that we use to infer the glossiness of materials, we analyzed the pictorial shortcuts used by 17th century painters to imitate the optical phenomenon of specular reflections when depicting grapes. Gloss perception of painted grapes was determined via a rating experiment. We computed the contrast, blurriness, and coverage of the grapes' highlights in the paintings' images, inspired by Marlow and Anderson (2013). The highlights were manually segmented from the images, and next the features contrast, coverage, and blurriness were semiautomatically quantified using self-defined algorithms. Multiple linear regressions of contrast and blurriness resulted in a predictive model that could explain 69% of the variance in gloss perception. No effect was found for coverage. These findings are in agreement with the instructions to render glossiness of grapes contained in a 17th century painting manual (Beurs, 1692/in press), suggesting that painting practice embeds knowledge about key image features that trigger specific material percepts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Perceptual Intelligence Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands.Perceptual Intelligence Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands.Perceptual Intelligence Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30897625

Citation

Di Cicco, Francesca, et al. "Understanding Gloss Perception Through the Lens of Art: Combining Perception, Image Analysis, and Painting Recipes of 17th Century Painted Grapes." Journal of Vision, vol. 19, no. 3, 2019, p. 7.
Di Cicco F, Wijntjes MWA, Pont SC. Understanding gloss perception through the lens of art: Combining perception, image analysis, and painting recipes of 17th century painted grapes. J Vis. 2019;19(3):7.
Di Cicco, F., Wijntjes, M. W. A., & Pont, S. C. (2019). Understanding gloss perception through the lens of art: Combining perception, image analysis, and painting recipes of 17th century painted grapes. Journal of Vision, 19(3), 7. https://doi.org/10.1167/19.3.7
Di Cicco F, Wijntjes MWA, Pont SC. Understanding Gloss Perception Through the Lens of Art: Combining Perception, Image Analysis, and Painting Recipes of 17th Century Painted Grapes. J Vis. 2019 03 1;19(3):7. PubMed PMID: 30897625.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Understanding gloss perception through the lens of art: Combining perception, image analysis, and painting recipes of 17th century painted grapes. AU - Di Cicco,Francesca, AU - Wijntjes,Maarten W A, AU - Pont,Sylvia C, PY - 2019/3/22/entrez PY - 2019/3/22/pubmed PY - 2019/7/23/medline SP - 7 EP - 7 JF - Journal of vision JO - J Vis VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - To understand the key image features that we use to infer the glossiness of materials, we analyzed the pictorial shortcuts used by 17th century painters to imitate the optical phenomenon of specular reflections when depicting grapes. Gloss perception of painted grapes was determined via a rating experiment. We computed the contrast, blurriness, and coverage of the grapes' highlights in the paintings' images, inspired by Marlow and Anderson (2013). The highlights were manually segmented from the images, and next the features contrast, coverage, and blurriness were semiautomatically quantified using self-defined algorithms. Multiple linear regressions of contrast and blurriness resulted in a predictive model that could explain 69% of the variance in gloss perception. No effect was found for coverage. These findings are in agreement with the instructions to render glossiness of grapes contained in a 17th century painting manual (Beurs, 1692/in press), suggesting that painting practice embeds knowledge about key image features that trigger specific material percepts. SN - 1534-7362 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30897625/Understanding_gloss_perception_through_the_lens_of_art:_Combining_perception_image_analysis_and_painting_recipes_of_17th_century_painted_grapes_ L2 - http://jov.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1167/19.3.7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -