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Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication Regimen and Out-of-Pocket Costs Among People Aged 35 to 64 With Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance.
Prev Chronic Dis. 2019 03 21; 16:E32.PC

Abstract

We used administrative claims data from 2014 on people with employer-sponsored health insurance to assess the proportion of patients taking antihypertensive medications, rates of nonadherence to these medication regimens, and out-of-pocket costs paid by patients. We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the association between out-of-pocket costs and nonadherence. Results indicated that patients filled the equivalent of 13 monthly prescriptions and paid $76 out of pocket over the calendar year; the likelihood of nonadherence increased as out-of-pocket costs increased (adjusted odds ratios ranged from 1.04 to 1.78; P < .001). These findings suggest a need for improvement in adherence among patients with employer-sponsored insurance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office of the Associate Director for Policy, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, MS US12-1, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027. Email: MBakerGoering@cdc.gov.Office of the Associate Director for Policy, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30900546

Citation

Baker-Goering, Madeleine M., et al. "Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication Regimen and Out-of-Pocket Costs Among People Aged 35 to 64 With Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance." Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 16, 2019, pp. E32.
Baker-Goering MM, Roy K, Howard DH. Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication Regimen and Out-of-Pocket Costs Among People Aged 35 to 64 With Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance. Prev Chronic Dis. 2019;16:E32.
Baker-Goering, M. M., Roy, K., & Howard, D. H. (2019). Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication Regimen and Out-of-Pocket Costs Among People Aged 35 to 64 With Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance. Preventing Chronic Disease, 16, E32. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd16.180381
Baker-Goering MM, Roy K, Howard DH. Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication Regimen and Out-of-Pocket Costs Among People Aged 35 to 64 With Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance. Prev Chronic Dis. 2019 03 21;16:E32. PubMed PMID: 30900546.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship Between Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication Regimen and Out-of-Pocket Costs Among People Aged 35 to 64 With Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance. AU - Baker-Goering,Madeleine M, AU - Roy,Kakoli, AU - Howard,David H, Y1 - 2019/03/21/ PY - 2019/3/23/entrez PY - 2019/3/23/pubmed PY - 2019/8/6/medline SP - E32 EP - E32 JF - Preventing chronic disease JO - Prev Chronic Dis VL - 16 N2 - We used administrative claims data from 2014 on people with employer-sponsored health insurance to assess the proportion of patients taking antihypertensive medications, rates of nonadherence to these medication regimens, and out-of-pocket costs paid by patients. We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the association between out-of-pocket costs and nonadherence. Results indicated that patients filled the equivalent of 13 monthly prescriptions and paid $76 out of pocket over the calendar year; the likelihood of nonadherence increased as out-of-pocket costs increased (adjusted odds ratios ranged from 1.04 to 1.78; P < .001). These findings suggest a need for improvement in adherence among patients with employer-sponsored insurance. SN - 1545-1151 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30900546/Relationship_Between_Adherence_to_Antihypertensive_Medication_Regimen_and_Out-of-Pocket_Costs_Among_People_Aged_35_to_64_With_Employer-Sponsored_Health_Insurance L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2019/18_0381.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -