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Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injuries Sustained During Marine Corps Recruit Training.
Mil Med. 2019 03 01; 184(Suppl 1):511-520.MM

Abstract

Musculoskeletal injuries cost the U.S. Marine Corps approximately $111 million and 356,000 lost duty days annually. Information identifying the most common types of injuries and events leading to their cause would help target mitigation efforts. The purpose of this effort was to conduct an archival data review of injuries and events leading to injury during recruit training. An archival dataset of Marine recruits from 2011 to 2016 was reviewed and included 43,004 observations from 28,829 unique individuals. Injuries were classified as mild, moderate, and severe and categorized into new overuse, preexisting overuse, and traumatic. Injury classification and categorization were stratified by event in which the injury occurred. The majority of injuries were due to overuse, and the most common types were sprains, strains, iliotibial band syndrome, and stress fractures, which constituted over 40% of all injuries. Conditioning hikes were the primary event leading to injury, with 31% of all injuries occurring during this training; running claimed 12%. Most injuries sustained during basic training comprised sprains and strains. Marines who remained uninjured during basic training outperformed those who reported at least one injury on fitness tests. These results point to enhanced conditioning as a potential entry point to target future intervention efforts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Innovative Employee Solutions, 9665 Granite Ridge Road, #420, San Diego, CA.Naval Health Research Center, Department of Warfighter Performance, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego, CA.Leidos, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego, CA.Naval Health Research Center, Department of Warfighter Performance, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego, CA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30901397

Citation

Jensen, Andrew E., et al. "Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injuries Sustained During Marine Corps Recruit Training." Military Medicine, vol. 184, no. Suppl 1, 2019, pp. 511-520.
Jensen AE, Laird M, Jameson JT, et al. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injuries Sustained During Marine Corps Recruit Training. Mil Med. 2019;184(Suppl 1):511-520.
Jensen, A. E., Laird, M., Jameson, J. T., & Kelly, K. R. (2019). Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injuries Sustained During Marine Corps Recruit Training. Military Medicine, 184(Suppl 1), 511-520. https://doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usy387
Jensen AE, et al. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injuries Sustained During Marine Corps Recruit Training. Mil Med. 2019 03 1;184(Suppl 1):511-520. PubMed PMID: 30901397.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injuries Sustained During Marine Corps Recruit Training. AU - Jensen,Andrew E, AU - Laird,Melissa, AU - Jameson,Jason T, AU - Kelly,Karen R, PY - 2018/08/08/received PY - 2018/10/31/revised PY - 2019/3/23/entrez PY - 2019/3/23/pubmed PY - 2019/7/16/medline KW - conditioning hikes KW - fitness KW - injury rates SP - 511 EP - 520 JF - Military medicine JO - Mil Med VL - 184 IS - Suppl 1 N2 - Musculoskeletal injuries cost the U.S. Marine Corps approximately $111 million and 356,000 lost duty days annually. Information identifying the most common types of injuries and events leading to their cause would help target mitigation efforts. The purpose of this effort was to conduct an archival data review of injuries and events leading to injury during recruit training. An archival dataset of Marine recruits from 2011 to 2016 was reviewed and included 43,004 observations from 28,829 unique individuals. Injuries were classified as mild, moderate, and severe and categorized into new overuse, preexisting overuse, and traumatic. Injury classification and categorization were stratified by event in which the injury occurred. The majority of injuries were due to overuse, and the most common types were sprains, strains, iliotibial band syndrome, and stress fractures, which constituted over 40% of all injuries. Conditioning hikes were the primary event leading to injury, with 31% of all injuries occurring during this training; running claimed 12%. Most injuries sustained during basic training comprised sprains and strains. Marines who remained uninjured during basic training outperformed those who reported at least one injury on fitness tests. These results point to enhanced conditioning as a potential entry point to target future intervention efforts. SN - 1930-613X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30901397/Prevalence_of_Musculoskeletal_Injuries_Sustained_During_Marine_Corps_Recruit_Training L2 - https://academic.oup.com/milmed/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/milmed/usy387 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -