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Accounting for individual differences in the response to tDCS with baseline levels of neurochemical excitability.
Cortex 2019; 115:324-334C

Abstract

There is now considerable evidence that applying a small electrical current to the cerebral cortex can have wide ranging effects on cognition and performance, and may provide substantial benefit as a treatment for conditions such as depression. However, there is variability across subjects in the extent to which stimulation modulates behaviour, providing a challenge for the development of applications. Here, we employed an individual differences approach to test if baseline concentrations of the neurochemicals GABA and glutamate are associated with an individual's response to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Using a previously replicated response selection training paradigm, we applied tDCS to the left prefrontal cortex part-way through the learning of a six-alternative-forced-choice task. Across three sessions, subjects received anodal, cathodal, or sham stimulation. Pre-tDCS baseline measures of GABA and glutamate, acquired using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), correlated with the extent to which stimulation modulated behaviour. Specifically, relative concentrations of GABA and glutamate (used as an index of neurochemical excitability) in the prefrontal cortex were associated with the degree to which active stimulation disrupted response selection training. This work represents an important step forward in developing models to predict stimulation efficacy, and provides a unique insight into how trait-based properties of the targeted cortex interact with stimulation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia. Electronic address: h.l.filmer@gmail.com.School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), Toronto, Canada.School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30903834

Citation

Filmer, Hannah L., et al. "Accounting for Individual Differences in the Response to tDCS With Baseline Levels of Neurochemical Excitability." Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior, vol. 115, 2019, pp. 324-334.
Filmer HL, Ehrhardt SE, Bollmann S, et al. Accounting for individual differences in the response to tDCS with baseline levels of neurochemical excitability. Cortex. 2019;115:324-334.
Filmer, H. L., Ehrhardt, S. E., Bollmann, S., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E. (2019). Accounting for individual differences in the response to tDCS with baseline levels of neurochemical excitability. Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior, 115, pp. 324-334. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2019.02.012.
Filmer HL, et al. Accounting for Individual Differences in the Response to tDCS With Baseline Levels of Neurochemical Excitability. Cortex. 2019;115:324-334. PubMed PMID: 30903834.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Accounting for individual differences in the response to tDCS with baseline levels of neurochemical excitability. AU - Filmer,Hannah L, AU - Ehrhardt,Shane E, AU - Bollmann,Saskia, AU - Mattingley,Jason B, AU - Dux,Paul E, Y1 - 2019/03/01/ PY - 2018/08/21/received PY - 2018/11/07/revised PY - 2019/02/06/accepted PY - 2019/3/25/pubmed PY - 2019/3/25/medline PY - 2019/3/24/entrez KW - Brain stimulation KW - Individual differences KW - Neurochemicals KW - Prefrontal cortex KW - tDCS SP - 324 EP - 334 JF - Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior JO - Cortex VL - 115 N2 - There is now considerable evidence that applying a small electrical current to the cerebral cortex can have wide ranging effects on cognition and performance, and may provide substantial benefit as a treatment for conditions such as depression. However, there is variability across subjects in the extent to which stimulation modulates behaviour, providing a challenge for the development of applications. Here, we employed an individual differences approach to test if baseline concentrations of the neurochemicals GABA and glutamate are associated with an individual's response to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Using a previously replicated response selection training paradigm, we applied tDCS to the left prefrontal cortex part-way through the learning of a six-alternative-forced-choice task. Across three sessions, subjects received anodal, cathodal, or sham stimulation. Pre-tDCS baseline measures of GABA and glutamate, acquired using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), correlated with the extent to which stimulation modulated behaviour. Specifically, relative concentrations of GABA and glutamate (used as an index of neurochemical excitability) in the prefrontal cortex were associated with the degree to which active stimulation disrupted response selection training. This work represents an important step forward in developing models to predict stimulation efficacy, and provides a unique insight into how trait-based properties of the targeted cortex interact with stimulation. SN - 1973-8102 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30903834/Accounting_for_individual_differences_in_the_response_to_tDCS_with_baseline_levels_of_neurochemical_excitability_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-9452(19)30064-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -