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Committed vs. uncommitted meat eaters: Understanding willingness to change protein consumption.

Abstract

There is a growing trend of consumers in developed countries substituting alternative protein sources for meat and purchasing meat products with specific production-system related credence attributes. This study of Australian meat consumers identifies consumer segments with varying levels of willingness to make the following changes to their protein consumption: reduce meat consumption, follow a meat-free diet most of the time, avoid meat consumption altogether, and follow a strict plant-based diet (i.e., stop eating all animal-products). Segments are characterised, and predictors of segment membership are determined. Discrete Factor analysis, based on a nationally-representative sample of 287 Australian meat consumers surveyed in 2016, identified four unique segments. Findings show that 46% of consumers are not willing to make any changes to their meat/protein consumption ('Committed Meat Eaters'), 22% are willing to reduce meat consumption ('Willing Meat Reducers'), 15% are willing to stop meat consumption/consume plant-based protein foods only ('Prospective Veg*ns'), and 17% are undecided about future change ('Undecided Meat Eaters'). The key factor differentiating Committed Meat Eaters from other segments is the perception that food choices are inadequate in meat-free diets. Committed Meat Eaters are also less likely to believe livestock farming contributes to climate change, and to report a recent reduction in the consumption of at least one type of meat than are Willing Meat Reducers and Prospective Veg*ns. These findings are expected to be of interest to individuals and organisations who may play a role in meeting current and future consumer demand for meat and alternative protein products.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    University of Adelaide, Centre for Global Food and Resources, Adelaide, South Australia, 5005, Australia. Electronic address: lenka.malek@adelaide.edu.au.

    ,

    University of Adelaide, Centre for Global Food and Resources, Adelaide, South Australia, 5005, Australia.

    University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2P5, Canada.

    Source

    Appetite 138: 2019 Jul 01 pg 115-126

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    30917940

    Citation

    Malek, Lenka, et al. "Committed Vs. Uncommitted Meat Eaters: Understanding Willingness to Change Protein Consumption." Appetite, vol. 138, 2019, pp. 115-126.
    Malek L, Umberger WJ, Goddard E. Committed vs. uncommitted meat eaters: Understanding willingness to change protein consumption. Appetite. 2019;138:115-126.
    Malek, L., Umberger, W. J., & Goddard, E. (2019). Committed vs. uncommitted meat eaters: Understanding willingness to change protein consumption. Appetite, 138, pp. 115-126. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2019.03.024.
    Malek L, Umberger WJ, Goddard E. Committed Vs. Uncommitted Meat Eaters: Understanding Willingness to Change Protein Consumption. Appetite. 2019 Jul 1;138:115-126. PubMed PMID: 30917940.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Committed vs. uncommitted meat eaters: Understanding willingness to change protein consumption. AU - Malek,Lenka, AU - Umberger,Wendy J, AU - Goddard,Ellen, Y1 - 2019/03/24/ PY - 2018/12/12/received PY - 2019/02/26/revised PY - 2019/03/19/accepted PY - 2019/3/29/pubmed PY - 2019/3/29/medline PY - 2019/3/29/entrez KW - Alternative protein sources KW - Consumer behaviour KW - Credence attributes KW - Food choice KW - Meat consumption KW - Meat substitutes SP - 115 EP - 126 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 138 N2 - There is a growing trend of consumers in developed countries substituting alternative protein sources for meat and purchasing meat products with specific production-system related credence attributes. This study of Australian meat consumers identifies consumer segments with varying levels of willingness to make the following changes to their protein consumption: reduce meat consumption, follow a meat-free diet most of the time, avoid meat consumption altogether, and follow a strict plant-based diet (i.e., stop eating all animal-products). Segments are characterised, and predictors of segment membership are determined. Discrete Factor analysis, based on a nationally-representative sample of 287 Australian meat consumers surveyed in 2016, identified four unique segments. Findings show that 46% of consumers are not willing to make any changes to their meat/protein consumption ('Committed Meat Eaters'), 22% are willing to reduce meat consumption ('Willing Meat Reducers'), 15% are willing to stop meat consumption/consume plant-based protein foods only ('Prospective Veg*ns'), and 17% are undecided about future change ('Undecided Meat Eaters'). The key factor differentiating Committed Meat Eaters from other segments is the perception that food choices are inadequate in meat-free diets. Committed Meat Eaters are also less likely to believe livestock farming contributes to climate change, and to report a recent reduction in the consumption of at least one type of meat than are Willing Meat Reducers and Prospective Veg*ns. These findings are expected to be of interest to individuals and organisations who may play a role in meeting current and future consumer demand for meat and alternative protein products. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30917940/Committed_vs__uncommitted_meat_eaters:_Understanding_willingness_to_change_protein_consumption_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(18)31793-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -