Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Unraveling corticobasal syndrome and alien limb syndrome with structural brain imaging.
Cortex 2019; 117:33-40C

Abstract

Alien limb phenomenon is a rare syndrome associated with a feeling of non-belonging and disowning toward one's limb. In contrast, anarchic limb phenomenon leads to involuntary but goal-directed movements. Alien/anarchic limb phenomena are frequent in corticobasal syndrome (CBS), an atypical parkinsonian syndrome characterized by rigidity, akinesia, dystonia, cortical sensory deficit, and apraxia. The structure-function relationship of alien/anarchic limb was investigated in multi-centric structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Whole-group and single-subject comparisons were made in 25 CBS and eight CBS-alien/anarchic limb patients versus controls. Support vector machine was used to see if CBS with and without alien/anarchic limb could be distinguished by structural MRI patterns. Whole-group comparison of CBS versus controls revealed asymmetric frontotemporal atrophy. CBS with alien/anarchic limb syndrome versus controls showed frontoparietal atrophy including the supplementary motor area contralateral to the side of the affected limb. Exploratory analysis identified frontotemporal regions encompassing the pre-/and postcentral gyrus as compromised in CBS with alien limb syndrome. Classification of CBS patients yielded accuracies of 79%. CBS-alien/anarchic limb syndrome was differentiated from CBS patients with an accuracy of 81%. Predictive differences were found in the cingulate gyrus spreading to frontomedian cortex, postcentral gyrus, and temporoparietoocipital regions. We present the first MRI-based group analysis on CBS-alien/anarchic limb. Results pave the way for individual clinical syndrome prediction and allow understanding the underlying neurocognitive architecture.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: falbrecht@cbs.mpg.de.Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany; Clinic of Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Technical University of Munich, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Clinic for Neurology, Saarland University, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Geriatric Psychiatry, University Bonn, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany.Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Clinic for Neurology, University of Ulm, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany.Clinic for Neurology, University of Ulm, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Würzburg, Germany.Clinic for Neurology, University of Ulm, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Clinic for Neurology, Saarland University, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Department of Neurology, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock, Germany & German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Rostock, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Geriatric Psychiatry, University Bonn, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Centre for Neurology & Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Tübingen, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany & German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) Göttingen, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Clinic of Neurology, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany.FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany; Clinic for Neurology, University of Ulm, Germany.No affiliation info availableMax Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany; Clinic of Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany; FTLD Consortium Germany, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30927559

Citation

Albrecht, Franziska, et al. "Unraveling Corticobasal Syndrome and Alien Limb Syndrome With Structural Brain Imaging." Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior, vol. 117, 2019, pp. 33-40.
Albrecht F, Mueller K, Ballarini T, et al. Unraveling corticobasal syndrome and alien limb syndrome with structural brain imaging. Cortex. 2019;117:33-40.
Albrecht, F., Mueller, K., Ballarini, T., Lampe, L., Diehl-Schmid, J., Fassbender, K., ... Schroeter, M. L. (2019). Unraveling corticobasal syndrome and alien limb syndrome with structural brain imaging. Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior, 117, pp. 33-40. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2019.02.015.
Albrecht F, et al. Unraveling Corticobasal Syndrome and Alien Limb Syndrome With Structural Brain Imaging. Cortex. 2019;117:33-40. PubMed PMID: 30927559.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unraveling corticobasal syndrome and alien limb syndrome with structural brain imaging. AU - Albrecht,Franziska, AU - Mueller,Karsten, AU - Ballarini,Tommaso, AU - Lampe,Leonie, AU - Diehl-Schmid,Janine, AU - Fassbender,Klaus, AU - Fliessbach,Klaus, AU - Jahn,Holger, AU - Jech,Robert, AU - Kassubek,Jan, AU - Kornhuber,Johannes, AU - Landwehrmeyer,Bernhard, AU - Lauer,Martin, AU - Ludolph,Albert C, AU - Lyros,Epameinondas, AU - Prudlo,Johannes, AU - Schneider,Anja, AU - Synofzik,Matthis, AU - Wiltfang,Jens, AU - Danek,Adrian, AU - Otto,Markus, AU - ,, AU - Schroeter,Matthias L, Y1 - 2019/02/25/ PY - 2018/08/10/received PY - 2018/12/03/revised PY - 2019/02/15/accepted PY - 2019/3/31/pubmed PY - 2019/3/31/medline PY - 2019/3/31/entrez KW - Alien limb syndrome KW - Anarchic limb syndrome KW - Corticobasal syndrome KW - Diagnosis prediction KW - Support vector machine SP - 33 EP - 40 JF - Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior JO - Cortex VL - 117 N2 - Alien limb phenomenon is a rare syndrome associated with a feeling of non-belonging and disowning toward one's limb. In contrast, anarchic limb phenomenon leads to involuntary but goal-directed movements. Alien/anarchic limb phenomena are frequent in corticobasal syndrome (CBS), an atypical parkinsonian syndrome characterized by rigidity, akinesia, dystonia, cortical sensory deficit, and apraxia. The structure-function relationship of alien/anarchic limb was investigated in multi-centric structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Whole-group and single-subject comparisons were made in 25 CBS and eight CBS-alien/anarchic limb patients versus controls. Support vector machine was used to see if CBS with and without alien/anarchic limb could be distinguished by structural MRI patterns. Whole-group comparison of CBS versus controls revealed asymmetric frontotemporal atrophy. CBS with alien/anarchic limb syndrome versus controls showed frontoparietal atrophy including the supplementary motor area contralateral to the side of the affected limb. Exploratory analysis identified frontotemporal regions encompassing the pre-/and postcentral gyrus as compromised in CBS with alien limb syndrome. Classification of CBS patients yielded accuracies of 79%. CBS-alien/anarchic limb syndrome was differentiated from CBS patients with an accuracy of 81%. Predictive differences were found in the cingulate gyrus spreading to frontomedian cortex, postcentral gyrus, and temporoparietoocipital regions. We present the first MRI-based group analysis on CBS-alien/anarchic limb. Results pave the way for individual clinical syndrome prediction and allow understanding the underlying neurocognitive architecture. SN - 1973-8102 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30927559/Unraveling_corticobasal_syndrome_and_alien_limb_syndrome_with_structural_brain_imaging L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-9452(19)30067-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -