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The Proteus syndrome: the Elephant Man diagnosed.
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Sep 13; 293(6548):683-5.BM

Abstract

Sir Frederick Treves first showed Joseph Merrick, the famous Elephant Man, to the Pathological Society of London in 1884. A diagnosis of neurofibromatosis was suggested in 1909 and was widely accepted. There is no evidence, however, of café au lait spots or histological proof of neurofibromas. It is also clear that Joseph Merrick's manifestations were much more bizarre than those commonly seen in neurofibromatosis. Evidence indicates that Merrick suffered from the Proteus syndrome and had the following features compatible with this diagnosis: macrocephaly; hyperostosis of the skull; hypertrophy of long bones; and thickened skin and subcutaneous tissues, particularly of the hands and feet, including plantar hyperplasia, lipomas, and other unspecified subcutaneous masses.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Biography
Case Reports
Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3092979

Citation

Tibbles, J A., and M M. Cohen. "The Proteus Syndrome: the Elephant Man Diagnosed." British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 293, no. 6548, 1986, pp. 683-5.
Tibbles JA, Cohen MM. The Proteus syndrome: the Elephant Man diagnosed. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986;293(6548):683-5.
Tibbles, J. A., & Cohen, M. M. (1986). The Proteus syndrome: the Elephant Man diagnosed. British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Ed.), 293(6548), 683-5.
Tibbles JA, Cohen MM. The Proteus Syndrome: the Elephant Man Diagnosed. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Sep 13;293(6548):683-5. PubMed PMID: 3092979.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Proteus syndrome: the Elephant Man diagnosed. AU - Tibbles,J A, AU - Cohen,M M,Jr PY - 1986/9/13/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1986/9/13/entrez SP - 683 EP - 5 JF - British medical journal (Clinical research ed.) JO - Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) VL - 293 IS - 6548 N2 - Sir Frederick Treves first showed Joseph Merrick, the famous Elephant Man, to the Pathological Society of London in 1884. A diagnosis of neurofibromatosis was suggested in 1909 and was widely accepted. There is no evidence, however, of café au lait spots or histological proof of neurofibromas. It is also clear that Joseph Merrick's manifestations were much more bizarre than those commonly seen in neurofibromatosis. Evidence indicates that Merrick suffered from the Proteus syndrome and had the following features compatible with this diagnosis: macrocephaly; hyperostosis of the skull; hypertrophy of long bones; and thickened skin and subcutaneous tissues, particularly of the hands and feet, including plantar hyperplasia, lipomas, and other unspecified subcutaneous masses. SN - 0267-0623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3092979/The_Proteus_syndrome:_the_Elephant_Man_diagnosed_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/3092979/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -