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The Association between Toxoplasma gondii Infection and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
Biomed Res Int. 2019; 2019:8186017.BR

Abstract

Background

Several studies have investigated the association between Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection and risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) with inconsistent results. Clarifying this relation might be useful for better understanding of the risk factors and the relevant mechanisms of PD, thus a meta-analysis was conducted to explore whether exposure to T. gondii is associated with an increased risk of PD.

Methods

We conducted this meta-analysis according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. A rigorous literature selection was performed by using the databases of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and ScienceDirect. Odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidential interval (CI) were pooled by using fixed-effects models. Sensitivity analysis, publication bias test, and methodological quality assessment of studies were also performed.

Results

Seven studies involving 1086 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled data by using fixed-effects models suggested both latent infection (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.58; P=0.314) and acute infection (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.30 to 4.35; P=0.855) were not associated with PD risk. Stable and robust estimates were confirmed by sensitivity analysis. No publication bias was found by visual inspection of the funnel plot, Begg's, and Egger's test.

Conclusions

This meta-analysis does not support any possible association between T. gondii infection and risk of PD. Researches are still warranted to further explore the underlying mechanisms of T. gondii in the pathogenesis of PD and their causal relationship.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Sichuan University West China School of Public Health, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, China.Department of Anorectal Surgery, Changhai Hospital of Shanghai, Shanghai 200433, China.Department of Neurorehabilitation, Shanghai Second Rehabilitation Hospital, Shanghai 200441, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Sichuan University West China School of Public Health, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, China.School of Rehabilitation Science, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China.Department of Neurorehabilitation, Shanghai Second Rehabilitation Hospital, Shanghai 200441, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Sichuan University West China School of Public Health, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan Province, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30931331

Citation

Zhou, Zonglei, et al. "The Association Between Toxoplasma Gondii Infection and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis." BioMed Research International, vol. 2019, 2019, p. 8186017.
Zhou Z, Zhou R, Li K, et al. The Association between Toxoplasma gondii Infection and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Biomed Res Int. 2019;2019:8186017.
Zhou, Z., Zhou, R., Li, K., Wei, W., Zhang, Z., Zhu, Y., & Luan, R. (2019). The Association between Toxoplasma gondii Infection and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. BioMed Research International, 2019, 8186017. https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/8186017
Zhou Z, et al. The Association Between Toxoplasma Gondii Infection and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Biomed Res Int. 2019;2019:8186017. PubMed PMID: 30931331.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Association between Toxoplasma gondii Infection and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. AU - Zhou,Zonglei, AU - Zhou,Ruzhen, AU - Li,Kunpeng, AU - Wei,Wen, AU - Zhang,Zengqiao, AU - Zhu,Yan, AU - Luan,Rongsheng, Y1 - 2019/02/25/ PY - 2018/11/20/received PY - 2019/01/20/revised PY - 2019/02/12/accepted PY - 2019/4/2/entrez PY - 2019/4/2/pubmed PY - 2019/7/19/medline SP - 8186017 EP - 8186017 JF - BioMed research international JO - Biomed Res Int VL - 2019 N2 - Background: Several studies have investigated the association between Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection and risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) with inconsistent results. Clarifying this relation might be useful for better understanding of the risk factors and the relevant mechanisms of PD, thus a meta-analysis was conducted to explore whether exposure to T. gondii is associated with an increased risk of PD. Methods: We conducted this meta-analysis according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. A rigorous literature selection was performed by using the databases of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and ScienceDirect. Odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidential interval (CI) were pooled by using fixed-effects models. Sensitivity analysis, publication bias test, and methodological quality assessment of studies were also performed. Results: Seven studies involving 1086 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled data by using fixed-effects models suggested both latent infection (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.58; P=0.314) and acute infection (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.30 to 4.35; P=0.855) were not associated with PD risk. Stable and robust estimates were confirmed by sensitivity analysis. No publication bias was found by visual inspection of the funnel plot, Begg's, and Egger's test. Conclusions: This meta-analysis does not support any possible association between T. gondii infection and risk of PD. Researches are still warranted to further explore the underlying mechanisms of T. gondii in the pathogenesis of PD and their causal relationship. SN - 2314-6141 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30931331/The_Association_between_Toxoplasma_gondii_Infection_and_Risk_of_Parkinson's_Disease:_A_Systematic_Review_and_Meta_Analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/8186017 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -