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Common Caribbean corals exhibit highly variable responses to future acidification and warming.
Proc Biol Sci. 2019 04 10; 286(1900):20182840.PB

Abstract

We conducted a 93-day experiment investigating the independent and combined effects of acidification (280-3300 µatm pCO2) and warming (28°C and 31°C) on calcification and linear extension rates of four key Caribbean coral species (Siderastrea siderea, Pseudodiploria strigosa, Porites astreoides, Undaria tenuifolia) from inshore and offshore reefs on the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System. All species exhibited nonlinear declines in calcification rate with increasing pCO2. Warming only reduced calcification in Ps. strigosa. Of the species tested, only S. siderea maintained positive calcification in the aragonite-undersaturated treatment . Temperature and pCO2 had no effect on the linear extension of S. siderea and Po. astreoides, and natal reef environment did not impact any parameter examined. Results suggest that S. siderea is the most resilient of these corals to warming and acidification owing to its ability to maintain positive calcification in all treatments, Ps. strigosa and U. tenuifolia are the least resilient, and Po. astreoides falls in the middle. These results highlight the diversity of calcification responses of Caribbean corals to projected global change.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Environment, Ecology, and Energy Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, NC , USA.4 Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University , Nahant, MA , USA.2 Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, NC , USA. 5 Department of Biology, Boston University , Boston, MA , USA.4 Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Northeastern University , Nahant, MA , USA.1 Environment, Ecology, and Energy Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, NC , USA. 3 Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, NC , USA.1 Environment, Ecology, and Energy Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, NC , USA. 2 Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, NC , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30940056

Citation

Bove, Colleen B., et al. "Common Caribbean Corals Exhibit Highly Variable Responses to Future Acidification and Warming." Proceedings. Biological Sciences, vol. 286, no. 1900, 2019, p. 20182840.
Bove CB, Ries JB, Davies SW, et al. Common Caribbean corals exhibit highly variable responses to future acidification and warming. Proc Biol Sci. 2019;286(1900):20182840.
Bove, C. B., Ries, J. B., Davies, S. W., Westfield, I. T., Umbanhowar, J., & Castillo, K. D. (2019). Common Caribbean corals exhibit highly variable responses to future acidification and warming. Proceedings. Biological Sciences, 286(1900), 20182840. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2018.2840
Bove CB, et al. Common Caribbean Corals Exhibit Highly Variable Responses to Future Acidification and Warming. Proc Biol Sci. 2019 04 10;286(1900):20182840. PubMed PMID: 30940056.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Common Caribbean corals exhibit highly variable responses to future acidification and warming. AU - Bove,Colleen B, AU - Ries,Justin B, AU - Davies,Sarah W, AU - Westfield,Isaac T, AU - Umbanhowar,James, AU - Castillo,Karl D, PY - 2019/4/4/entrez PY - 2019/4/4/pubmed PY - 2020/3/19/medline KW - Caribbean corals KW - calcification KW - linear extension KW - ocean acidification KW - ocean warming SP - 20182840 EP - 20182840 JF - Proceedings. Biological sciences JO - Proc. Biol. Sci. VL - 286 IS - 1900 N2 - We conducted a 93-day experiment investigating the independent and combined effects of acidification (280-3300 µatm pCO2) and warming (28°C and 31°C) on calcification and linear extension rates of four key Caribbean coral species (Siderastrea siderea, Pseudodiploria strigosa, Porites astreoides, Undaria tenuifolia) from inshore and offshore reefs on the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System. All species exhibited nonlinear declines in calcification rate with increasing pCO2. Warming only reduced calcification in Ps. strigosa. Of the species tested, only S. siderea maintained positive calcification in the aragonite-undersaturated treatment . Temperature and pCO2 had no effect on the linear extension of S. siderea and Po. astreoides, and natal reef environment did not impact any parameter examined. Results suggest that S. siderea is the most resilient of these corals to warming and acidification owing to its ability to maintain positive calcification in all treatments, Ps. strigosa and U. tenuifolia are the least resilient, and Po. astreoides falls in the middle. These results highlight the diversity of calcification responses of Caribbean corals to projected global change. SN - 1471-2954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30940056/Common_Caribbean_corals_exhibit_highly_variable_responses_to_future_acidification_and_warming_ L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rspb.2018.2840?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -