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Circulating TNFSF14 (Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 14) Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease.
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2019 06; 39(6):1240-1252.AT

Abstract

Objective- Basic research indicates that TNFSF14 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily 14) may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Given the requirements of new biomarkers for risk classification in coronary artery disease (CAD), we conducted a longitudinal analysis to investigate if TNFSF14 levels are associated with the risk of cardiovascular events among patients with stable CAD. Approach and Results- In total, 894 patients with CAD were enrolled in a multicenter prospective study. The primary outcome was the occurrence of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke. The secondary outcome was the occurrence of all-cause death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, revascularization, and hospitalization because of angina or heart failure. During the mean follow-up period of 22±9 months, 32 patients reached the primary outcome and 166 patients reached the secondary outcome. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the event-free survival was significantly different in the first and fourth quartile groups in subjects categorized by TNFSF14 levels. In multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, TNFSF14 was independently associated with the risk of cardiovascular events after adjustment for various relevant factors (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25). In the validation cohort of 126 multivessel patients with CAD, TNFSF14 was confirmed to provide good prognostic predictive value for composite cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04-1.19). Conclusions- This is the first study to demonstrate that increased TNFSF14 levels were independently associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with stable CAD. Future studies are worthy to validate if TNFSF14 could be a novel prognostic biomarker for CAD outcomes over different populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Clinical Medicine (C.-Y. Hsu, R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Cardiovascular Research Center (C.-Y. Hsu, P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Division of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taiwan (C.-Y. Hsu, C.-Y. Huang). Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan (C.-Y. Hsu, C.-Y. Huang).Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (W.-K.T.). Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (W.-K.T.).Cardiology Division of Cardiovascular Medical Center and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan (Y.-W.W.).Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital and Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan (T.-H.L.).Mackay Memorial Hospital, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (H.-I.Y.).Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (K.-C.C.). Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (K.-C.C.).Department of Cardiology, Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital, Tzu-Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (J.-H.W.).From the Divison of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Department of Critical Care Medicine (R.-H.C., P.-H.H.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Institute of Clinical Medicine (C.-Y. Hsu, R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.Division of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taiwan (C.-Y. Hsu, C.-Y. Huang). Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan (C.-Y. Hsu, C.-Y. Huang).From the Divison of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Department of Critical Care Medicine (R.-H.C., P.-H.H.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Institute of Clinical Medicine (C.-Y. Hsu, R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Cardiovascular Research Center (C.-Y. Hsu, P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.From the Divison of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Heath Care and Management Center (H.-B.L., S.-J.L.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Institute of Clinical Medicine (C.-Y. Hsu, R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Cardiovascular Research Center (C.-Y. Hsu, P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.School of Medicine (W.-H.Y.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Division of Cardiology, Heart Center, Cheng-Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (W.-H.Y.).Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Taipei (C.-C.W.). Department of Primary Care Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei (C.-C.W.).From the Divison of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Heath Care and Management Center (H.-B.L., S.-J.L.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Institute of Clinical Medicine (C.-Y. Hsu, R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Cardiovascular Research Center (C.-Y. Hsu, P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.From the Divison of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (R.-H.C., P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Department of Medical Research (J.-W.C.), Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan. Institute of Pharmacology (J.-W.C.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Cardiovascular Research Center (C.-Y. Hsu, P.-H.H., H.-B.L., S.-J.L., J.-W.C.), National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30943772

Citation

Hsu, Chien-Yi, et al. "Circulating TNFSF14 (Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 14) Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease." Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 39, no. 6, 2019, pp. 1240-1252.
Hsu CY, Tseng WK, Wu YW, et al. Circulating TNFSF14 (Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 14) Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2019;39(6):1240-1252.
Hsu, C. Y., Tseng, W. K., Wu, Y. W., Lin, T. H., Yeh, H. I., Chang, K. C., Wang, J. H., Chou, R. H., Huang, C. Y., Huang, P. H., Leu, H. B., Yin, W. H., Wu, C. C., Lin, S. J., & Chen, J. W. (2019). Circulating TNFSF14 (Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 14) Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 39(6), 1240-1252. https://doi.org/10.1161/ATVBAHA.118.312166
Hsu CY, et al. Circulating TNFSF14 (Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 14) Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2019;39(6):1240-1252. PubMed PMID: 30943772.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Circulating TNFSF14 (Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 14) Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease. AU - Hsu,Chien-Yi, AU - Tseng,Wei-Kung, AU - Wu,Yen-Wen, AU - Lin,Tsung-Hsien, AU - Yeh,Hung-I, AU - Chang,Kuan-Cheng, AU - Wang,Ji-Hung, AU - Chou,Ruey-Hsing, AU - Huang,Chun-Yao, AU - Huang,Po-Hsun, AU - Leu,Hsin-Bang, AU - Yin,Wei-Hsian, AU - Wu,Chau-Chung, AU - Lin,Shing-Jong, AU - Chen,Jaw-Wen, PY - 2019/4/5/pubmed PY - 2020/2/6/medline PY - 2019/4/5/entrez KW - C-reactive protein KW - atherosclerosis KW - coronary artery disease KW - myocardial infarction KW - tumor necrosis factor SP - 1240 EP - 1252 JF - Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology JO - Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol VL - 39 IS - 6 N2 - Objective- Basic research indicates that TNFSF14 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily 14) may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Given the requirements of new biomarkers for risk classification in coronary artery disease (CAD), we conducted a longitudinal analysis to investigate if TNFSF14 levels are associated with the risk of cardiovascular events among patients with stable CAD. Approach and Results- In total, 894 patients with CAD were enrolled in a multicenter prospective study. The primary outcome was the occurrence of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke. The secondary outcome was the occurrence of all-cause death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, revascularization, and hospitalization because of angina or heart failure. During the mean follow-up period of 22±9 months, 32 patients reached the primary outcome and 166 patients reached the secondary outcome. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the event-free survival was significantly different in the first and fourth quartile groups in subjects categorized by TNFSF14 levels. In multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, TNFSF14 was independently associated with the risk of cardiovascular events after adjustment for various relevant factors (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25). In the validation cohort of 126 multivessel patients with CAD, TNFSF14 was confirmed to provide good prognostic predictive value for composite cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04-1.19). Conclusions- This is the first study to demonstrate that increased TNFSF14 levels were independently associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with stable CAD. Future studies are worthy to validate if TNFSF14 could be a novel prognostic biomarker for CAD outcomes over different populations. SN - 1524-4636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30943772/Circulating_TNFSF14__Tumor_Necrosis_Factor_Superfamily_14__Predicts_Clinical_Outcome_in_Patients_With_Stable_Coronary_Artery_Disease_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/ATVBAHA.118.312166?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -