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Providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) service provision in Amhara region public health facility, Ethiopia.
PLoS One 2019; 14(4):e0214334Plos

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices (PP-IUCD) are one type of post-partum family planning method, which can be provided to a post-partum woman starting from the placental delivery time (within 10 minutes), or within the first 48 hours of postpartum period. In most developing countries, delivery time is the primary opportunity for women to access post-partum family planning methods, especially for those living in remote areas. Hence, this study assesses providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device service provision.

METHODS

A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Amhara region health center and hospitals. Health providers surveyed included obstetricians, gynecologists, general practitioners, emergency surgical officers, health officers, midwives and nurses from September 18, 2015 to December18, 2016. Simple random sampling was used to select 864 subjects. Data were collected by using a structured self-administered questionnaire and observing the facility. Multilevel analysis was done to see factors associated with outcome.

RESULTS

A total of 197 health facilities and 864 providers are included in the final analysis. Of the total providers 524 (60.6%) were from a health center. The mean age (±SD) of participants was 27.8 years (±5.4). The number of providers with good knowledge accounted for 253 of those surveyed (29.3%). The proportion of good knowledge among trained PP-IUCD providers was 35.7% (those who scored above average), and 27.9% was untrained about PP-IUCD. A considerable heterogeneity was observed between health facilities for each indicator of provider's knowledge. Gender differences were observed as the mean knowledge score deference on PP-IUCD by 0.4 points (β = -0.41; -0.72, -0.10) when the participant was female. Having experience of regular counseling of pregnant women increases PP-IUCD knowledge score by 0.97. (β = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.48, 1.47). Where the health facility requested clients to purchase the IUCD themselves, the mean knowledge score decreased by 0.47 points compared with free of charge at the facility level (β = -0.47; 95%CI: -0.87, -0.07).

CONCLUSION

Our findings showed that providers' knowledge about postpartum IUCD was low in the Amhara region public health facility. The lowest knowledge score was noted among nurses, health Officers, midwives, and general practice professionals. Factors associated with providers' knowledge on PP-IUCD are the status of health facility, female sex, training on PP-IUCD, regular counseling of pregnant women, and unavailability of IUCD service.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Human Nutrition, Institute of Public Health, College of medicine and Health science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Amhara regional Health Biuro, Bahir-Dar, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecologyn, College of Medicine and Health Science Debretabor University, Debretabor, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine and Health Science University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30946759

Citation

Abebaw, Yeshiwas, et al. "Providers' Knowledge On Postpartum Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (PPIUCD) Service Provision in Amhara Region Public Health Facility, Ethiopia." PloS One, vol. 14, no. 4, 2019, pp. e0214334.
Abebaw Y, Berhe S, Abebe SM, et al. Providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) service provision in Amhara region public health facility, Ethiopia. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(4):e0214334.
Abebaw, Y., Berhe, S., Abebe, S. M., Adefris, M., Gebeyehu, A., Gure, T., ... G/Egziabher, M. A. (2019). Providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) service provision in Amhara region public health facility, Ethiopia. PloS One, 14(4), pp. e0214334. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0214334.
Abebaw Y, et al. Providers' Knowledge On Postpartum Intrauterine Contraceptive Device (PPIUCD) Service Provision in Amhara Region Public Health Facility, Ethiopia. PLoS ONE. 2019;14(4):e0214334. PubMed PMID: 30946759.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) service provision in Amhara region public health facility, Ethiopia. AU - Abebaw,Yeshiwas, AU - Berhe,Solomon, AU - Abebe,Solomon Mekonnen, AU - Adefris,Mulat, AU - Gebeyehu,Abebaw, AU - Gure,Tadesse, AU - Asmare,Birtukan, AU - Dagnu,Masresha, AU - Alebachew,Wubetu, AU - Admasu,Shumye, AU - Abdisa,Solomon, AU - G/Egziabher,Melkamu Axumawit, Y1 - 2019/04/04/ PY - 2018/12/15/received PY - 2019/03/11/accepted PY - 2019/4/5/entrez PY - 2019/4/5/pubmed PY - 2019/4/5/medline SP - e0214334 EP - e0214334 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices (PP-IUCD) are one type of post-partum family planning method, which can be provided to a post-partum woman starting from the placental delivery time (within 10 minutes), or within the first 48 hours of postpartum period. In most developing countries, delivery time is the primary opportunity for women to access post-partum family planning methods, especially for those living in remote areas. Hence, this study assesses providers' knowledge on postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device service provision. METHODS: A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Amhara region health center and hospitals. Health providers surveyed included obstetricians, gynecologists, general practitioners, emergency surgical officers, health officers, midwives and nurses from September 18, 2015 to December18, 2016. Simple random sampling was used to select 864 subjects. Data were collected by using a structured self-administered questionnaire and observing the facility. Multilevel analysis was done to see factors associated with outcome. RESULTS: A total of 197 health facilities and 864 providers are included in the final analysis. Of the total providers 524 (60.6%) were from a health center. The mean age (±SD) of participants was 27.8 years (±5.4). The number of providers with good knowledge accounted for 253 of those surveyed (29.3%). The proportion of good knowledge among trained PP-IUCD providers was 35.7% (those who scored above average), and 27.9% was untrained about PP-IUCD. A considerable heterogeneity was observed between health facilities for each indicator of provider's knowledge. Gender differences were observed as the mean knowledge score deference on PP-IUCD by 0.4 points (β = -0.41; -0.72, -0.10) when the participant was female. Having experience of regular counseling of pregnant women increases PP-IUCD knowledge score by 0.97. (β = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.48, 1.47). Where the health facility requested clients to purchase the IUCD themselves, the mean knowledge score decreased by 0.47 points compared with free of charge at the facility level (β = -0.47; 95%CI: -0.87, -0.07). CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that providers' knowledge about postpartum IUCD was low in the Amhara region public health facility. The lowest knowledge score was noted among nurses, health Officers, midwives, and general practice professionals. Factors associated with providers' knowledge on PP-IUCD are the status of health facility, female sex, training on PP-IUCD, regular counseling of pregnant women, and unavailability of IUCD service. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30946759/Providers'_knowledge_on_postpartum_intrauterine_contraceptive_device__PPIUCD__service_provision_in_Amhara_region_public_health_facility_Ethiopia_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214334 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -