Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Diet and Inflammation in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease.
Curr Nutr Rep. 2019 06; 8(2):53-65.CN

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Nutrition is known to modulate the immune system and may alter neuroinflammatory processes implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and progression of neurodegeneration. Here, we review the evidence for healthy dietary patterns and age-related cognition and discuss potential neuroinflammatory actions of diet on cognitive function.

RECENT FINDINGS

Anti-inflammatory dietary patterns such as the Mediterranean diet (MD) and dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) may be neuroprotective. Several dietary components consumed in the MD and DASH (omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and polyphenols) can inhibit neuroinflammation associated with AD. Anti-inflammatory diets may also attenuate neuroinflammation via indirect immune pathways from the gut microbiome and systemic circulation. Diet may influence cognitive ageing via several inflammatory pathways. However, data from human studies are lacking and the exact mechanisms linking diet to cognitive function remain elusive. Further dietary intervention studies are required to investigate diet-associated neurological change from the earliest through to latest stages of cognitive decline. Furthermore, incorporation of neuroimaging measures in intervention studies would advance current understanding of the mechanistic effects of dietary modification on neuroinflammation in the ageing brain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Health and Society and Newcastle University Institute of Ageing, Newcastle University, Biomedical Research Building, Campus of Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE4 5PL, UK.Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT12 6BJ, UK.Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT12 6BJ, UK.Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT12 6BJ, UK.Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT12 6BJ, UK.Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT12 6BJ, UK.Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT12 6BJ, UK. c.mcevoy@qub.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30949921

Citation

McGrattan, Andrea M., et al. "Diet and Inflammation in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease." Current Nutrition Reports, vol. 8, no. 2, 2019, pp. 53-65.
McGrattan AM, McGuinness B, McKinley MC, et al. Diet and Inflammation in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease. Curr Nutr Rep. 2019;8(2):53-65.
McGrattan, A. M., McGuinness, B., McKinley, M. C., Kee, F., Passmore, P., Woodside, J. V., & McEvoy, C. T. (2019). Diet and Inflammation in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease. Current Nutrition Reports, 8(2), 53-65. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13668-019-0271-4
McGrattan AM, et al. Diet and Inflammation in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease. Curr Nutr Rep. 2019;8(2):53-65. PubMed PMID: 30949921.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet and Inflammation in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease. AU - McGrattan,Andrea M, AU - McGuinness,Bernadette, AU - McKinley,Michelle C, AU - Kee,Frank, AU - Passmore,Peter, AU - Woodside,Jayne V, AU - McEvoy,Claire T, PY - 2019/4/6/pubmed PY - 2020/3/17/medline PY - 2019/4/6/entrez KW - Alzheimer’s disease KW - Cognition KW - Cognitive ageing KW - Cognitive function KW - Diet KW - Dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) KW - Dietary patterns KW - Inflammation KW - Mechanisms KW - Mediterranean diet (MD) KW - Nutrients KW - Pathways KW - Pro-inflammatory diets SP - 53 EP - 65 JF - Current nutrition reports JO - Curr Nutr Rep VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Nutrition is known to modulate the immune system and may alter neuroinflammatory processes implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and progression of neurodegeneration. Here, we review the evidence for healthy dietary patterns and age-related cognition and discuss potential neuroinflammatory actions of diet on cognitive function. RECENT FINDINGS: Anti-inflammatory dietary patterns such as the Mediterranean diet (MD) and dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) may be neuroprotective. Several dietary components consumed in the MD and DASH (omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and polyphenols) can inhibit neuroinflammation associated with AD. Anti-inflammatory diets may also attenuate neuroinflammation via indirect immune pathways from the gut microbiome and systemic circulation. Diet may influence cognitive ageing via several inflammatory pathways. However, data from human studies are lacking and the exact mechanisms linking diet to cognitive function remain elusive. Further dietary intervention studies are required to investigate diet-associated neurological change from the earliest through to latest stages of cognitive decline. Furthermore, incorporation of neuroimaging measures in intervention studies would advance current understanding of the mechanistic effects of dietary modification on neuroinflammation in the ageing brain. SN - 2161-3311 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30949921/Diet_and_Inflammation_in_Cognitive_Ageing_and_Alzheimer's_Disease_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/30949921/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -