Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dietary total fat, fatty acids intake, and risk of cardiovascular disease: a dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies.
Lipids Health Dis. 2019 Apr 06; 18(1):91.LH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between dietary fat intake and cardiovascular disease. However, dietary recommendations based on systematic review and meta-analysis might be more credible.

METHODS AND RESULTS

Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane library were searched up to July 1st 2018 for cohort studies reporting associations of dietary fat intake and risk of CVDs. By comparing the highest vs. the lowest categories of fat or fatty acids intake, we found that higher dietary trans fatty acids (TFA) intake was associated with increased risk of CVDs [RR:1.14(1.08-1.21)]. However, no association was observed between total fat, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), saturated fatty acids (SFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and risk of CVDs. Subgroup analysis found a cardio-protective effect of PUFA in the studies that has been followed up more than 10 years [0.95(0.91-0.99), I2 = 62.4%]. Dose-response analysis suggested that the risk of CVDs increased 16% [1.16 (1.07-1.25), Plinearity = 0.033] for an increment of 2% energy/day of TFA intake.

CONCLUSIONS

This current meta-analysis of cohort studies suggested that total fat, SFA, MUFA, and PUFA intake were not associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, we found that higher TFA intake is associated with greater risk of CVDs in a dose-response fashion. Furthermore, the subgroup analysis found a cardio-protective effect of PUFA in studies followed up for more than 10 years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, The first affiliated hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.Department of Nutrition, The first affiliated hospital of Zhengzhou University, No. 1 Eastern Jianshe road, Zhengzhou, 450052, Henan, China. Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Department of Nutrition, The first affiliated hospital of Zhengzhou University, No. 1 Eastern Jianshe road, Zhengzhou, 450052, Henan, China. liuyanhua1015@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30954077

Citation

Zhu, Yongjian, et al. "Dietary Total Fat, Fatty Acids Intake, and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies." Lipids in Health and Disease, vol. 18, no. 1, 2019, p. 91.
Zhu Y, Bo Y, Liu Y. Dietary total fat, fatty acids intake, and risk of cardiovascular disease: a dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies. Lipids Health Dis. 2019;18(1):91.
Zhu, Y., Bo, Y., & Liu, Y. (2019). Dietary total fat, fatty acids intake, and risk of cardiovascular disease: a dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies. Lipids in Health and Disease, 18(1), 91. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12944-019-1035-2
Zhu Y, Bo Y, Liu Y. Dietary Total Fat, Fatty Acids Intake, and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies. Lipids Health Dis. 2019 Apr 6;18(1):91. PubMed PMID: 30954077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary total fat, fatty acids intake, and risk of cardiovascular disease: a dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies. AU - Zhu,Yongjian, AU - Bo,Yacong, AU - Liu,Yanhua, Y1 - 2019/04/06/ PY - 2019/01/25/received PY - 2019/03/29/accepted PY - 2019/4/8/entrez PY - 2019/4/8/pubmed PY - 2019/7/30/medline KW - Cardiovascular disease KW - Dose-response KW - Fat KW - Fatty acids KW - Meta-analysis SP - 91 EP - 91 JF - Lipids in health and disease JO - Lipids Health Dis VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between dietary fat intake and cardiovascular disease. However, dietary recommendations based on systematic review and meta-analysis might be more credible. METHODS AND RESULTS: Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane library were searched up to July 1st 2018 for cohort studies reporting associations of dietary fat intake and risk of CVDs. By comparing the highest vs. the lowest categories of fat or fatty acids intake, we found that higher dietary trans fatty acids (TFA) intake was associated with increased risk of CVDs [RR:1.14(1.08-1.21)]. However, no association was observed between total fat, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), saturated fatty acids (SFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and risk of CVDs. Subgroup analysis found a cardio-protective effect of PUFA in the studies that has been followed up more than 10 years [0.95(0.91-0.99), I2 = 62.4%]. Dose-response analysis suggested that the risk of CVDs increased 16% [1.16 (1.07-1.25), Plinearity = 0.033] for an increment of 2% energy/day of TFA intake. CONCLUSIONS: This current meta-analysis of cohort studies suggested that total fat, SFA, MUFA, and PUFA intake were not associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, we found that higher TFA intake is associated with greater risk of CVDs in a dose-response fashion. Furthermore, the subgroup analysis found a cardio-protective effect of PUFA in studies followed up for more than 10 years. SN - 1476-511X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30954077/Dietary_total_fat_fatty_acids_intake_and_risk_of_cardiovascular_disease:_a_dose_response_meta_analysis_of_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://lipidworld.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12944-019-1035-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -