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Effects of mandatory prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) use laws on prescriber registration and use and on risky prescribing.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 06 01; 199:1-9.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Comprehensive mandatory use laws for prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have been implemented in a number of states to help address the opioid overdose epidemic. These laws may reduce opioid-related overdose deaths by increasing prescribers' use of PDMPs and reducing high-risk prescribing behaviors.

METHODS

We used state PDMP data to examine the effect of these mandates on prescriber registration, use of the PDMP, and on prescription-based measures of patient risk in three states-Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia-that implemented mandates between 2010 and 2015. We conducted comparative interrupted time series analyses to examine changes in outcome measures after the implementation of mandates in the mandate states compared to control states.

RESULTS

Mandatory use laws increased prescriber registration and utilization of the PDMP in the mandate states compared to controls. The multiple provider episode rate, rate of opioid prescribing, rate of overlapping opioid prescriptions, and rate of overlapping opioid/benzodiazepine prescriptions decreased in Kentucky and Ohio. Nevertheless, the magnitude of changes in these measures varied among mandates states.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings indicate that PDMP mandates have the potential to reduce risky opioid prescribing practices. Variation in the laws may explain why the effectiveness varied between states.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Behavioral Health, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA. Electronic address: strickler@brandeis.edu.Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan and VA Center for Clinical Management Research, University of Michigan North Campus Research Complex, 2800 Rd., Bldg. 16, Room 227W, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Institute for Behavioral Health, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30954863

Citation

Strickler, Gail K., et al. "Effects of Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Use Laws On Prescriber Registration and Use and On Risky Prescribing." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 199, 2019, pp. 1-9.
Strickler GK, Zhang K, Halpin JF, et al. Effects of mandatory prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) use laws on prescriber registration and use and on risky prescribing. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019;199:1-9.
Strickler, G. K., Zhang, K., Halpin, J. F., Bohnert, A. S. B., Baldwin, G. T., & Kreiner, P. W. (2019). Effects of mandatory prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) use laws on prescriber registration and use and on risky prescribing. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 199, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.02.010
Strickler GK, et al. Effects of Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Use Laws On Prescriber Registration and Use and On Risky Prescribing. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 06 1;199:1-9. PubMed PMID: 30954863.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of mandatory prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) use laws on prescriber registration and use and on risky prescribing. AU - Strickler,Gail K, AU - Zhang,Kun, AU - Halpin,John F, AU - Bohnert,Amy S B, AU - Baldwin,Grant T, AU - Kreiner,Peter W, Y1 - 2019/03/22/ PY - 2018/08/10/received PY - 2019/01/30/revised PY - 2019/02/03/accepted PY - 2019/4/8/pubmed PY - 2019/12/25/medline PY - 2019/4/8/entrez KW - Opioids KW - Prescriber mandates KW - Prescription drug monitoring programs SP - 1 EP - 9 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 199 N2 - BACKGROUND: Comprehensive mandatory use laws for prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have been implemented in a number of states to help address the opioid overdose epidemic. These laws may reduce opioid-related overdose deaths by increasing prescribers' use of PDMPs and reducing high-risk prescribing behaviors. METHODS: We used state PDMP data to examine the effect of these mandates on prescriber registration, use of the PDMP, and on prescription-based measures of patient risk in three states-Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia-that implemented mandates between 2010 and 2015. We conducted comparative interrupted time series analyses to examine changes in outcome measures after the implementation of mandates in the mandate states compared to control states. RESULTS: Mandatory use laws increased prescriber registration and utilization of the PDMP in the mandate states compared to controls. The multiple provider episode rate, rate of opioid prescribing, rate of overlapping opioid prescriptions, and rate of overlapping opioid/benzodiazepine prescriptions decreased in Kentucky and Ohio. Nevertheless, the magnitude of changes in these measures varied among mandates states. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that PDMP mandates have the potential to reduce risky opioid prescribing practices. Variation in the laws may explain why the effectiveness varied between states. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30954863/Effects_of_mandatory_prescription_drug_monitoring_program__PDMP__use_laws_on_prescriber_registration_and_use_and_on_risky_prescribing_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(19)30081-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -