Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Epidemiological study of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia, April-May 2015.
Rev Sci Tech. 2018 12; 37(3):985-997.RS

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted in five regions in Saudi Arabia to investigate the epidemiology of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) during April and May2015. Serum and nasal swab samples were tested for MERS-CoV antibodies andribonucleic acid (RNA) using a recombinant enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (rELISA) and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), respectively. The overall MERS-CoV antibody seroprevalence was 80.5%, whereas the overall viral RNA prevalence was 2.4%. The associations of risk factors with each prevalence were quantified using univariate and multivariate analyses. The multivariate models identified region, age, grazing system, exposure to wild animals and dung removal as factors significantly associated with seroprevalence (p ??0.05). A higher seroprevalence was more likely to occur in camels from the Riyadh, Eastern, Northern and Makkah regions than those from the Jazan region; camels ??4 and 1-3 years of age (marginally significant) than calves < 1 year; and camels raised in zero grazing and semi-open grazing systems than those raised in an open grazing system. However, the presence of wild animals and daily dung removal were negatively associated with seroprevalence. On the other hand, region and sex were significantly associated with MERS-CoV RNA prevalence(p ??0.05). A higher viral RNA prevalence was more likely to occur in camels from the Riyadh region and Eastern region (marginally significant) than in those from the Makkah region, and in male camels than female camels. In conclusion, the risk factors identified in this study can be considered to be predictors of MERS-CoV infection in camels and should be taken into account when developing an efficient and cost-effective control strategy.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30964454

Citation

Elfadil, A A., et al. "Epidemiological Study of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection in Dromedary Camels in Saudi Arabia, April-May 2015." Revue Scientifique Et Technique (International Office of Epizootics), vol. 37, no. 3, 2018, pp. 985-997.
Elfadil AA, Ahmed AG, Abdalla MO, et al. Epidemiological study of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia, April-May 2015. Rev Sci Tech. 2018;37(3):985-997.
Elfadil, A. A., Ahmed, A. G., Abdalla, M. O., Gumaa, E., Osman, O. H., Younis, A. E., Abu-Obeida, A., Al-Hafufi, A. N., Saif, L. J., Zaki, A., Al-Rumaihi, A., Al-Harbi, N., Kasem, S., Al-Brahim, R. H., Al-Sahhaf, A., Bayoumi, F. E., Al-Dowairij, A., & Qasim, I. A. (2018). Epidemiological study of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia, April-May 2015. Revue Scientifique Et Technique (International Office of Epizootics), 37(3), 985-997. https://doi.org/10.20506/rst.37.3.2901
Elfadil AA, et al. Epidemiological Study of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection in Dromedary Camels in Saudi Arabia, April-May 2015. Rev Sci Tech. 2018;37(3):985-997. PubMed PMID: 30964454.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiological study of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia, April-May 2015. AU - Elfadil,A A, AU - Ahmed,A G, AU - Abdalla,M O, AU - Gumaa,E, AU - Osman,O H, AU - Younis,A E, AU - Abu-Obeida,A, AU - Al-Hafufi,A N, AU - Saif,L J, AU - Zaki,A, AU - Al-Rumaihi,A, AU - Al-Harbi,N, AU - Kasem,S, AU - Al-Brahim,R H, AU - Al-Sahhaf,A, AU - Bayoumi,F E, AU - Al-Dowairij,A, AU - Qasim,I A, PY - 2019/4/10/entrez PY - 2019/4/10/pubmed PY - 2019/5/2/medline KW - Camel KW - Dromedary camel KW - Epidemiology KW - MERS-CoV KW - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus KW - Prevalence KW - Risk factor KW - Saudi Arabia SP - 985 EP - 997 JF - Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics) JO - Rev Sci Tech VL - 37 IS - 3 N2 - A cross-sectional study was conducted in five regions in Saudi Arabia to investigate the epidemiology of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) during April and May2015. Serum and nasal swab samples were tested for MERS-CoV antibodies andribonucleic acid (RNA) using a recombinant enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (rELISA) and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), respectively. The overall MERS-CoV antibody seroprevalence was 80.5%, whereas the overall viral RNA prevalence was 2.4%. The associations of risk factors with each prevalence were quantified using univariate and multivariate analyses. The multivariate models identified region, age, grazing system, exposure to wild animals and dung removal as factors significantly associated with seroprevalence (p ??0.05). A higher seroprevalence was more likely to occur in camels from the Riyadh, Eastern, Northern and Makkah regions than those from the Jazan region; camels ??4 and 1-3 years of age (marginally significant) than calves < 1 year; and camels raised in zero grazing and semi-open grazing systems than those raised in an open grazing system. However, the presence of wild animals and daily dung removal were negatively associated with seroprevalence. On the other hand, region and sex were significantly associated with MERS-CoV RNA prevalence(p ??0.05). A higher viral RNA prevalence was more likely to occur in camels from the Riyadh region and Eastern region (marginally significant) than in those from the Makkah region, and in male camels than female camels. In conclusion, the risk factors identified in this study can be considered to be predictors of MERS-CoV infection in camels and should be taken into account when developing an efficient and cost-effective control strategy. SN - 0253-1933 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30964454/Epidemiological_study_of_Middle_East_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus_infection_in_dromedary_camels_in_Saudi_Arabia_April_May_2015_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.20506/rst.37.3.2901 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -