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Beverage intake during alternate-day fasting: Relationship to energy intake and body weight.
Nutr Health. 2019 Sep; 25(3):167-171.NH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alternate-day fasting (ADF) involves a 'famine day' (25% energy intake) and a 'feast day' (ad libitum intake). This secondary analysis examined changes in beverage intake in relation to energy intake and body weight during 12 months of ADF versus daily calorie restriction (CR).

METHODS

Obese subjects (n = 100 enrolled, n = 69 completers) were randomized to one of three groups for 12 months: (a) ADF; (b) CR; or (c) control.

RESULTS

At baseline, intakes of diet soda, caffeinated beverages, sugar-sweetened soda, alcohol, juice, and milk were similar between groups. There were no statistically significant changes in the intake of these beverages by month 6 or 12 between ADF (feast or famine day), CR, or control groups. Beverage intake was not related to energy intake or body weight at month 6 or 12 in any group.

CONCLUSION

These pilot findings suggest that intermittent fasting does not impact beverage intake in a way that affects energy intake or body weight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA.Charles Perkins Center, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA.Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA.Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA.Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA.Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30983506

Citation

Kalam, Faiza, et al. "Beverage Intake During Alternate-day Fasting: Relationship to Energy Intake and Body Weight." Nutrition and Health, vol. 25, no. 3, 2019, pp. 167-171.
Kalam F, Kroeger CM, Trepanowski JF, et al. Beverage intake during alternate-day fasting: Relationship to energy intake and body weight. Nutr Health. 2019;25(3):167-171.
Kalam, F., Kroeger, C. M., Trepanowski, J. F., Gabel, K., Song, J. H., Cienfuegos, S., & Varady, K. A. (2019). Beverage intake during alternate-day fasting: Relationship to energy intake and body weight. Nutrition and Health, 25(3), 167-171. https://doi.org/10.1177/0260106019841452
Kalam F, et al. Beverage Intake During Alternate-day Fasting: Relationship to Energy Intake and Body Weight. Nutr Health. 2019;25(3):167-171. PubMed PMID: 30983506.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beverage intake during alternate-day fasting: Relationship to energy intake and body weight. AU - Kalam,Faiza, AU - Kroeger,Cynthia M, AU - Trepanowski,John F, AU - Gabel,Kelsey, AU - Song,Jee Hee, AU - Cienfuegos,Sofia, AU - Varady,Krista A, Y1 - 2019/04/14/ PY - 2019/4/16/pubmed PY - 2020/3/3/medline PY - 2019/4/16/entrez KW - Beverage intake KW - alcohol KW - alternate-day fasting KW - body weight KW - caffeine KW - calorie restriction KW - obese adults KW - soda SP - 167 EP - 171 JF - Nutrition and health JO - Nutr Health VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alternate-day fasting (ADF) involves a 'famine day' (25% energy intake) and a 'feast day' (ad libitum intake). This secondary analysis examined changes in beverage intake in relation to energy intake and body weight during 12 months of ADF versus daily calorie restriction (CR). METHODS: Obese subjects (n = 100 enrolled, n = 69 completers) were randomized to one of three groups for 12 months: (a) ADF; (b) CR; or (c) control. RESULTS: At baseline, intakes of diet soda, caffeinated beverages, sugar-sweetened soda, alcohol, juice, and milk were similar between groups. There were no statistically significant changes in the intake of these beverages by month 6 or 12 between ADF (feast or famine day), CR, or control groups. Beverage intake was not related to energy intake or body weight at month 6 or 12 in any group. CONCLUSION: These pilot findings suggest that intermittent fasting does not impact beverage intake in a way that affects energy intake or body weight. SN - 0260-1060 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30983506/Beverage_intake_during_alternate_day_fasting:_Relationship_to_energy_intake_and_body_weight_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0260106019841452?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -