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Identifying factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts following military sexual trauma.
J Affect Disord. 2019 06 01; 252:300-309.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

As increasing research demonstrates that military sexual trauma (MST) is associated with suicidal ideation and attempts, discerning factors that place MST survivors at risk for these outcomes is critical. The present study aimed to: (1) characterize suicidal ideation and attempts among MST survivors; (2) identify factors associated with post-MST suicide attempts, post-MST suicidal ideation, and past-week suicidal ideation.

METHODS

A convenience sample of 108 veterans (66 women, 42 men) who reported a history of MST participated in this cross-sectional study. Pre-MST suicidal ideation and attempt, childhood physical and sexual abuse, military sexual assault, institutional betrayal, and posttraumatic cognitions about self, world, and self-blame were examined, with age and gender as covariates.

RESULTS

Seventy-five percent of participants reported experiencing post-MST suicidal ideation, and 40.7% reported attempting suicide following MST. Pre-MST suicide attempt and posttraumatic cognitions about self were associated with post-MST suicide attempt. Pre-MST suicidal ideation, military sexual assault, childhood physical abuse, and posttraumatic cognitions about self were associated with post-MST suicidal ideation. Lastly, pre-MST suicidal ideation and posttraumatic cognitions about self were associated with past-week suicidal ideation; results were unchanged when accounting for recent PTSD or depressive symptoms.

LIMITATIONS

The cross-sectional design, retrospective self-report, and small sample are limitations.

CONCLUSIONS

Addressing negative posttraumatic beliefs about self may be important for managing suicide risk among MST survivors. Assessing for pre-MST suicidal ideation and attempt is likely also warranted. Further understanding of the longitudinal impact of posttraumatic beliefs about self on subsequent risk for suicidal ideation and attempt is warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) for Suicide Prevention, 1700 North Wheeling, Aurora, CO 80045, United States; Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, United States. Electronic address: lindsey.monteith@va.gov.Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) for Suicide Prevention, 1700 North Wheeling, Aurora, CO 80045, United States; Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, United States.Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) for Suicide Prevention, 1700 North Wheeling, Aurora, CO 80045, United States.Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) for Suicide Prevention, 1700 North Wheeling, Aurora, CO 80045, United States; Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, United States; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, United States.Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) for Suicide Prevention, 1700 North Wheeling, Aurora, CO 80045, United States; Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, United States; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

30991258

Citation

Monteith, Lindsey L., et al. "Identifying Factors Associated With Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts Following Military Sexual Trauma." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 252, 2019, pp. 300-309.
Monteith LL, Holliday R, Schneider AL, et al. Identifying factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts following military sexual trauma. J Affect Disord. 2019;252:300-309.
Monteith, L. L., Holliday, R., Schneider, A. L., Forster, J. E., & Bahraini, N. H. (2019). Identifying factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts following military sexual trauma. Journal of Affective Disorders, 252, 300-309. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2019.04.038
Monteith LL, et al. Identifying Factors Associated With Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts Following Military Sexual Trauma. J Affect Disord. 2019 06 1;252:300-309. PubMed PMID: 30991258.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identifying factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts following military sexual trauma. AU - Monteith,Lindsey L, AU - Holliday,Ryan, AU - Schneider,Alexandra L, AU - Forster,Jeri E, AU - Bahraini,Nazanin H, Y1 - 2019/04/08/ PY - 2018/11/08/received PY - 2019/03/12/revised PY - 2019/04/07/accepted PY - 2019/4/17/pubmed PY - 2020/1/29/medline PY - 2019/4/17/entrez KW - Military sexual trauma KW - Posttraumatic cognitions KW - Sexual assault KW - Suicidal ideation KW - Suicide attempt KW - Veteran SP - 300 EP - 309 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 252 N2 - BACKGROUND: As increasing research demonstrates that military sexual trauma (MST) is associated with suicidal ideation and attempts, discerning factors that place MST survivors at risk for these outcomes is critical. The present study aimed to: (1) characterize suicidal ideation and attempts among MST survivors; (2) identify factors associated with post-MST suicide attempts, post-MST suicidal ideation, and past-week suicidal ideation. METHODS: A convenience sample of 108 veterans (66 women, 42 men) who reported a history of MST participated in this cross-sectional study. Pre-MST suicidal ideation and attempt, childhood physical and sexual abuse, military sexual assault, institutional betrayal, and posttraumatic cognitions about self, world, and self-blame were examined, with age and gender as covariates. RESULTS: Seventy-five percent of participants reported experiencing post-MST suicidal ideation, and 40.7% reported attempting suicide following MST. Pre-MST suicide attempt and posttraumatic cognitions about self were associated with post-MST suicide attempt. Pre-MST suicidal ideation, military sexual assault, childhood physical abuse, and posttraumatic cognitions about self were associated with post-MST suicidal ideation. Lastly, pre-MST suicidal ideation and posttraumatic cognitions about self were associated with past-week suicidal ideation; results were unchanged when accounting for recent PTSD or depressive symptoms. LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional design, retrospective self-report, and small sample are limitations. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing negative posttraumatic beliefs about self may be important for managing suicide risk among MST survivors. Assessing for pre-MST suicidal ideation and attempt is likely also warranted. Further understanding of the longitudinal impact of posttraumatic beliefs about self on subsequent risk for suicidal ideation and attempt is warranted. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/30991258/Identifying_factors_associated_with_suicidal_ideation_and_suicide_attempts_following_military_sexual_trauma_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(18)32775-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -