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How closely do mercury trends in fish and other aquatic wildlife track those in the atmosphere? - Implications for evaluating the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention.
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Jul 15; 674:58-70.ST

Abstract

The Minamata Convention to reduce anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emissions entered into force in 2017, and attention is now focused on how to best monitor its effectiveness at reducing Hg exposure to humans. A key question is how closely Hg concentrations in the human food chain, especially in fish and other aquatic wildlife, will track the changes in atmospheric Hg that are expected to occur following anthropogenic emission reductions. We investigated this question by evaluating several regional groups of case studies where Hg concentrations in aquatic biota have been monitored continuously or intermittently for several decades. Our analysis shows that in most cases Hg time trends in biota did not agree with concurrent Hg trends in atmospheric deposition or concentrations, and the divergence between the two trends has become more apparent over the past two decades. An over-arching general explanation for these results is that the impact of changing atmospheric inputs on biotic Hg is masked by two factors: 1) The aquatic environment contains a large inventory of legacy emitted Hg that remains available for bio-uptake leading to a substantial lag in biotic response time to a change in external inputs; and 2) Biotic Hg trends reflect the dominant effects of changes in multi-causal, local and regional processes (e.g., aquatic or terrestrial biogeochemical processes, feeding ecology, climate) that control the speciation, bioavailability, and bio-uptake of both present-day and legacy emitted Hg. Globally, climate change has become the most prevalent contributor to the divergence. A wide range of biotic Hg outcomes can thus be expected as anthropogenic atmospheric Hg emissions decline, depending on how these processes operate on specific regions and specific organisms. Therefore, evaluating the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention will require biomonitoring of multiple species that represent different trophic and ecological niches in multiple regions of the world.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Earth Observation Science, and Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: feiyue.wang@umanitoba.ca.Centre for Earth Observation Science, and Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada; Geological Survey of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, 601 Booth St., Ottawa, ON K1A 0E8, Canada.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 46 Guanshui Road, Guiyang 550002, China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 46 Guanshui Road, Guiyang 550002, China.Aix Marseille Université, CNRS/INSU, Université de Toulon, IRD, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO) UM 110, 13288 Marseille, France.Department of Marine Sciences, University of Connecticut, 1080 Shennecossett Road, Groton, CT 06340, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31003088

Citation

Wang, Feiyue, et al. "How Closely Do Mercury Trends in Fish and Other Aquatic Wildlife Track Those in the Atmosphere? - Implications for Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Minamata Convention." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 674, 2019, pp. 58-70.
Wang F, Outridge PM, Feng X, et al. How closely do mercury trends in fish and other aquatic wildlife track those in the atmosphere? - Implications for evaluating the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention. Sci Total Environ. 2019;674:58-70.
Wang, F., Outridge, P. M., Feng, X., Meng, B., Heimbürger-Boavida, L. E., & Mason, R. P. (2019). How closely do mercury trends in fish and other aquatic wildlife track those in the atmosphere? - Implications for evaluating the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention. The Science of the Total Environment, 674, 58-70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.101
Wang F, et al. How Closely Do Mercury Trends in Fish and Other Aquatic Wildlife Track Those in the Atmosphere? - Implications for Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Minamata Convention. Sci Total Environ. 2019 Jul 15;674:58-70. PubMed PMID: 31003088.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How closely do mercury trends in fish and other aquatic wildlife track those in the atmosphere? - Implications for evaluating the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention. AU - Wang,Feiyue, AU - Outridge,Peter M, AU - Feng,Xinbin, AU - Meng,Bo, AU - Heimbürger-Boavida,Lars-Eric, AU - Mason,Robert P, Y1 - 2019/04/09/ PY - 2019/02/17/received PY - 2019/04/07/revised PY - 2019/04/08/accepted PY - 2019/4/20/pubmed PY - 2019/5/15/medline PY - 2019/4/20/entrez KW - Aquatic ecosystems KW - Atmospheric emissions KW - Climate change KW - Fish KW - Mercury KW - Minamata Convention SP - 58 EP - 70 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci Total Environ VL - 674 N2 - The Minamata Convention to reduce anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emissions entered into force in 2017, and attention is now focused on how to best monitor its effectiveness at reducing Hg exposure to humans. A key question is how closely Hg concentrations in the human food chain, especially in fish and other aquatic wildlife, will track the changes in atmospheric Hg that are expected to occur following anthropogenic emission reductions. We investigated this question by evaluating several regional groups of case studies where Hg concentrations in aquatic biota have been monitored continuously or intermittently for several decades. Our analysis shows that in most cases Hg time trends in biota did not agree with concurrent Hg trends in atmospheric deposition or concentrations, and the divergence between the two trends has become more apparent over the past two decades. An over-arching general explanation for these results is that the impact of changing atmospheric inputs on biotic Hg is masked by two factors: 1) The aquatic environment contains a large inventory of legacy emitted Hg that remains available for bio-uptake leading to a substantial lag in biotic response time to a change in external inputs; and 2) Biotic Hg trends reflect the dominant effects of changes in multi-causal, local and regional processes (e.g., aquatic or terrestrial biogeochemical processes, feeding ecology, climate) that control the speciation, bioavailability, and bio-uptake of both present-day and legacy emitted Hg. Globally, climate change has become the most prevalent contributor to the divergence. A wide range of biotic Hg outcomes can thus be expected as anthropogenic atmospheric Hg emissions decline, depending on how these processes operate on specific regions and specific organisms. Therefore, evaluating the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention will require biomonitoring of multiple species that represent different trophic and ecological niches in multiple regions of the world. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31003088/How_closely_do_mercury_trends_in_fish_and_other_aquatic_wildlife_track_those_in_the_atmosphere___Implications_for_evaluating_the_effectiveness_of_the_Minamata_Convention_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(19)31622-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -